Broadsides

Displaying 1 - 12 of 14

United Democracy for Stark

Publication containing excerpts from newspapers throughout the state with endorsements and positive reports for Stark's candidacy for governor.

Questions and Answers on the 10-Year Plan

Broadside with a Q&A concerning the Ten-Year Plan. This document was disseminated in support of the propositions to be voted upon at the May 26, 1931 election. These propositions include numerous developments to public utilities and services.

Questionaire, No. 3 for Judge Truman

A flyer that seeks to disparage Harry S. Truman in his 1924 campaign for re-election as Judge of Jackson County. The document lists ten questions directed towards Harry S. Truman for the reader to consider before voting. The unnamed "Publicity Committee" attempts to implicate Truman with the Pendergast Machine within the questions.

Questionaire, No. 2 for Judge Truman

A flyer that seeks to disparage Harry S. Truman in his 1924 campaign for re-election as Judge of Jackson County. The document lists ten questions directed towards Harry S. Truman for the reader to consider before voting. The unnamed "Publicity Committee" implies that all important decisions made by Truman are first approved by the Pendergast Machine.

Questionaire, No. 1 for Judge Truman

A flyer that seeks to disparage Harry S. Truman in his 1924 campaign for re-election as Judge of Jackson County. The document lists seven questions directed towards Harry S. Truman for the reader to consider before voting. The unnamed "Publicity Committee" implies that all important decisions made by Truman are first approved by the Pendergast Machine.

Public Sale!: Closing Out Sale of the Grand Old Party

Sardonic broadside indirectly urging the public to vote Democrat on November 8, 1932 by advertising a "closing out sale" of the Republican Party and the Hoover Administration.

Hood-Pratt Basket Picnic

An invitation to attend the Hood-Pratt Basket Picnic on the farm of William H. Wallace on Saturday, July 26, 1924. Guest speakers Mrs. Henry L. Ess, R. L. Hood, Judge Pratt, Judge E. W. Hayes, Judge John I. Williamson, Ex-Supreme Judge, Attorney L. T. Dryden, and others are invited to speak on the corruption in Jackson County politics and organize efforts against said corruption.

Democratic Barbecue at Arthur W. Nelson's Farm

Advertisement for a barbecue in Bunceton, Missouri in support of John W. Davis, Democratic Candidate for President. Transportation to the event is organized by M. J. Pendergast, and Frank C. Marqua with tickets on sale at the City Clerk's Office, Court House Cigar Stand, Jackson Democratic Club, Jefferson Democratic Club, and the Missouri Pacific Ticket Office.

Anti-Ku Klux Klan and Republican Broadside

A 1922 broadside for distribution amongst black Jackson County voters that implicates the Republican candidates for office with the Ku Klux Klan. The document, addressed from "A Real American", urges the African-American community to vote against these Republican candidates, declaring that "many of these same candidates are members of the order."

Anti-Klu Klux Klan Broadside: "A Challenge to Negro Citizens"

One-sided anti-Klu Klux Klan broadside written by O. J. Gilmore of Kansas City, Missouri. Gilmore provides an excerpt of a statement by Kansas Governor Henry Justin Allen and an account from the Saturday Evening Post that detail the racism and violence exhibited by the KKK. Gilmore then includes an excerpt of Congressman E. C. Ellis, Republican candidate for Congress, in which Ellis aligns himself with the views of the KKK.

1919 Road Map of Greater Kansas City

Broadside including two road maps: one with an approximately 115 mile radius around Kansas City; and one of the Kansas City metropolitan area. The text of the broadside emphasizes the need for good roads in and around Kansas City so that the region can be competitive in agriculture. The document then outlines a plan for infrastructure in Missouri and Kansas.

"Is Truman A Taxpayer?"

A flyer that disparages Harry S. Truman in his 1924 campaign for re-election as Judge of Jackson County. The document states that Truman's county tax for 1924 is 98 cents. The unnamed "Publicity Committee" asks the reader to compare Truman's tax burden with theirs.