Correspondence

Displaying 1 - 12 of 1670

U.S. vs. Morris Stephens, Earl B. Winans, Grace B. Clark, et al.: Dismissal

Letter from U.S. Attorney Maurice M. Milligan to U.S. District Court Clerk A. L. Arnold requesting that the charges against Glen Van Dyke in Criminal Case #13839 be dismissed.

U.S. vs. Frank Balestrere: Order

Order in Criminal Case No. 12392: United States vs. Frank Balestrere, defendant. The order, signed by Judge Merrill E. Otis, orders Balestrere's release from the Johnson County Jail on January 6, 1934. Otis cites Balestrere's lack of previous criminal record and letters from doctors attesting to Balestrere's poor health. The order states that upon his release, Balestrere will be subject to two years of probation.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Memo from W. Harold Lane to Charles O'B. Berry

Memorandum from W. Harold Lane, Internal Revenue Service Special Agent, to the Special Agent in Charge (elsewhere identified as Charles O'B. Berry), regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The memo reports that, in a discussion with Governor Lloyd Stark about the conviction of Charles Gargotta for assault of Sheriff Thomas Bash, Stark stated that he suspected that Pendergast was "directing his political organization" while in prison.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Memo from Robert H. Hudspeth to James V. Bennett

Memorandum from Robert H. Hudspeth, warden of the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, to James V. Bennett, director of the Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The memo discusses allegations that Pendergast was running his political organization during his imprisonment, and and investigation by the Intelligence Unit of the Bureau of Internal Revenue into the matter.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Memo from Robert H. Hudspeth to James V. Bennett

Memorandum from Robert H. Hudspeth, warden of the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, to James V. Bennett, director of the Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The memo discusses Pendergast assigning his lawyers power of attorney to deal with his income tax liability with the Treasury Department, and lists Pendergast's visitor log, including attorneys and Treasury Department agents. The memo also notes that Pendergast has paid "a substantial portion" of his back taxes owed. Also included is a letter of introduction from Charles O'B.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Marital Status Confirmation

Letter from N. R. Timmons, Chief Parole Officer at the Leavenworth Penitentiary, to the Jackson County Recorder of Deeds, requesting confirmation of the marital status of Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Recorder John P. Sherrod replies with confirmation that Pendergast married Carolyn "Carrie" E. Snider on February 3, 1911. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Letter from Mattie Acock to Ruby Carr

Letter from Mattie Acock to Ruby Carr at the Justice Department regarding Tom Pendergast. Acock writes that Pendergast is a "good man" who gave her husband a job and has been "so good to the poor people," and she hopes he "will get to come home right away. She also writes at length about being poor and her other difficulties. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Letter from Mattie Acock to Franklin D. Roosevelt

Letter from Mattie Acock to President Franklin D. Roosevelt regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Acock writes asking for Roosevelt to support Pendergast's parole, and says that Governor Lloyd Stark is mad because Pendergast got former governor Guy B.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Letter from Lewis J. Grout to Myrl E. Alexander

Letter from Lewis J. Grout, Chief U.S. Probation Officer, to Myrl E. Alexander, Acting Parole Executive with the Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Grout summarizes Pendergast's case, noting he plead guilty to multiple charges of income tax evasion, and notes that there are special conditions of probation, including paying a fine and back taxes. Grout also draws attention to editorials from the May 22, 1939 edition of the Kansas City Star and the May 23, 1939 edition of the Kansas City Times.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Letter from James V. Bennett to Robert H. Hudspeth

Letter from James V. Bennett, Director of the Bureau of Prisons, to Robert Hudspeth, warden of the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Bennett writes regarding allegations made by Governor Lloyd Stark that Pendergast "was directing his political organization from Leavenworth," and his discussion about that issue with Elmer Irey, who works in Treasury Department law enforcement. Irey concluded that Stark was misinformed, and that Pendergast was not engaged in political activity from prison.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Letter from James V. Bennett to A. D. Fairbanks

Letter from James V. Bennett, Director of the Bureau of Prisons, to U.S. Marshal A. D. Fairbanks regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. In it, Bennett writes that he does not believe they should depart from regulations to allow "special visits" from a Mr. Smith to Pendergast while in custody, and notes that Pendergast "has less than a month and a half yet to serve" and therefore will soon be free to have visitors at any time.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Letter from Franklin Miller to Carl F. Zarter

Letter from Franklin Miller, Circuit Attorney for the City of St. Louis, to Carl Zarter, Record Clerk for the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The letter discusses the grand jury investigation into R. Emmet O'Malley, former State Superintendent of Insurance, and the charge of bribery with which he is being charged, and addresses the possible further investigation into Pendergast's role in that crime.