Kansas City Police Department

Displaying 109 - 119 of 119
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter dictated for a telegram from Governor Lloyd C. Stark to Colonel Otto P. Higgins, Kansas City Director of Police, regarding the requests he has received for National Guard protection for the upcoming election, and asking for his opinion of the matter.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter signed "A Kansas Citian" to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, requesting assistance in ensuring honest elections in Kansas City by protecting voters, judges, and clerks.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from W. T. Foley to Governor Lloyd Stark describing an encounter with the Kansas City, Missouri, Police Department in which he was arrested at the city limit for speeding and had money taken by the officers.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Russell C. Cravens to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, thanking him for his work in cleaning up elections and the Kansas City police department. He also requests that Clark look into the "issuance of 'special lisences [sic] to the Kansas City political crowd," as they are routinely committing driving violations while using them. He is particularly upset at the "tax favoritism situation," noting large discrepancies between property tax assessments between his and other properties in his neighborhood.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Kansas City Police Department newsletter from October 1940, sent to "leading Kansas Citians." The newsletter describes programs to protect local children from traffic and "exhibitionists and moral lepers," to eliminate marijuana growing within the city limits, and police training. It also includes information about the American Youth Club, the Kansas City Police Band, and the Police Quartet winning 4th place in the National Barber Shop Quartet Contest at the New York World's Fair.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from John T. Harding to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, discussing corruption in the city and county government, as well as the local police department. He tells Stark that until he enacts new laws, "Kansas City will be at the mercy of the Organization. The Police Department is their gun; as long as they have it, they will make us step around." Harding also suggests that the Pendergast Machine has control over nearly every aspect of the city, "except the sewer system," and indicates that he believes most policemen are good and only acting on orders from above.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from George E. Kimball to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, discussing corruption in public service. Kimball identifies himself as "a former judge of the Jackson County Court, a former City Comtroller of Kansas City, and a Republican candidate for Mayor of Kansas in 1930." He writes to recommend Fred H. Carlson as trustworthy, "clean in his private life as well as his public service," and "highly in favor of taking the police department out of the hands of the corrupt political machine here in Kansas City."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Fred C. Reynolds, former election judge and policeman, to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, suggesting that state troopers be used to protect the upcoming elections, because "I do not think the police can handle it."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Telegram from Governor Lloyd C. Stark to the Kansas City Board of Election Commissioners, regarding requests for National Guard protection to ensure voter safety at the upcoming election and asking for their opinions on the matter.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Kansas City, Missouri Department of Police Director Otto P. Higgins to Wayne Miner Post No. 149 Post Commander Dr. Milton C. Lewis. Higgins writes that he appreciates Lewis's letter concerning police officers Cavanaugh and Keleher.

Union Station
Author: 
Jason Roe
Kansas City Public Library

On June 17, 1933, four law enforcement officers and their prisoner, Frank Nash, were fatally wounded in a botched rescue attempt outside Union Station. The story of the Union Station Massacre, as it became known, centered on Frank Nash, who had been convicted of three separate crimes of a serious nature: murder, armed burglary, and then assault.

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