Kansas City Star

Displaying 37 - 48 of 97

Political attack advertisement that documents Kansas City Star owner August F. Seested's political exploits for personal gain in local real estate. This document was produced to discourage Kansas Citians from voting for Kansas City Police Commissioner Matthew Foster, the Republican candidate for mayor.

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a photo and article, continued on page 8, about "Dr.

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today.

Photographs and quotes from Tony Gizzo, Kansas City mafia figure, during his testimony before the U.S. Senate Special Committee to Investigate Organized Crime in Interstate Commerce, popularly known as the Kefauver Committee. Gizzo is quoted as saying "Senator, I wish to hell you would tell me what the Mafia is.

Letter labeled "PERSONAL" from S. H. Toucey to Senator Estes Kefauver, regarding his Special Committee to Investigate Organized Crime in Interstate Commerce.

First issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a statement on the newspaper's objective, maintaining that the newspaper is not against any certain political party or vice, but that it is simply for "good government".

Memorandum regarding Joe DiGiovanni's criminal history, listing charges beginning with a 1920 Prohibition violation to which he plead guilty, and spanning through 1930. DiGiovanni was charged with numerous Prohibition and other liquor violations.

Postcard showing the reviewing stand in front of The Kansas City Star building for the American Legion Parade in Kansas City, Missouri. This parade, along with the Liberty Memorial dedication, took place over three days in late 1921: October 30, 31 and November 1st. Gen. Jacques of Belgium, Gen.

Irwin Krikwood

After William Rockhill Nelson's death in 1915, Laura and Irwin ran the Kansas City Star with the help of the Nelson-trained staff. Under her leadership, the Star printed its first photograph and first comics, both banned by her father, and began WDAF Radio as part of the Star empire.

If not for a five-year period battle with tuberculosis, Richard Fowler, one of the Kansas City Star’s most prolific writers, might have spent his life as a chicken farmer. A five-year period of enforced bed rest began Fowler’s writing career in 1930.

Letter from Dan L. Fennell regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L.

Letter from Lewis J. Grout, Chief U.S. Probation Officer, to Myrl E. Alexander, Acting Parole Executive with the Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY