Works Progress Administration

Displaying 13 - 24 of 119
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Oma R. Bell, local supervisor of the National Youth Administration Historical Records Survey, to Harold J. Henderson, state director of the Historical Records Survey project of the Federal Writers' Project, a part of the Works Progress Administration. Bell writes that the Wyandotte County Courthouse project is now complete, with her research workers having written "3,604 HR forms," from which she made 465 "condensed copies" covering all the materials in storage.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

List of Clerk of the District Court records at the Wyandotte County Courthouse vault. County records were being assessed and organized as part of a Works Progress Administration project through the Federal Writers' Project's Historical Records Survey.

Genre: 
Correspondence
Miscellaneous Documents

Letter from Oma R. Bell, local supervisor of the National Youth Administration Historical Records Survey, to Harold J. Henderson, state director of the Historical Records Survey project of the Federal Writers' Project, a part of the Works Progress Administration. Bell writes with an update on remaining documents in the courthouse storage vault, and notes that she has enclosed documents dealing with the inventory of offices and vaults in the Kansas City city hall. That document is included.

Genre: 
Photographs

Photograph of a meeting of a Workers Alliance Lodge meeting. Identified attendees are Charles Northington wearing suspenders; John Waltz, the adult man at far left; and Earl Burnley, the man in a tie, third from right in the front row. Workers Alliance was a national organization of unemployed people who found relief through the Works Progress Administration jobs. The group became closely affiliated with the Communist Party, and lobbied for increased funding for the WPA. "Workers Alliance Dinner up our house" is written at the top of the photograph.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, describing the inequality of property tax assessments throughout Jackson County and other costs of homeownership. Other featured articles include: “He Beats the Rap but You Take It” (p.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about J. C. Nichols and his city planning projects in Kansas City with the Country Club residential district and Country Club Plaza shopping center, etc., including a photo of Nichols. Other featured articles include: “To Better Serve His Clients” (p.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a notice that Future’s publishers plan to temporarily suspend publication to reorganize the paper, and also note that “youth is interested and youth is organizing,” and “FUTURE is their paper.” Other featured articles include: “Why Charge a Cover?” (p.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about crime in Kansas City, the lack of accurate, trustworthy records about its frequency and location, and the city’s “inefficient, politically-controlled police department.” Other featured articles include: “Mister Welching” (p.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the effusive spending of city funds on the Kansas City Zoo, comparing the luxurious living conditions of a tiger there to many thousands of Kansas Citians with very poor housing and utilities, etc., including illustrative photos. Other featured articles include: “Arson Aylor” (p.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the “lug,” “an involuntary or forced contribution to something a luckless employee isn’t nearly as interested in” as his and his family’s own welfare. Other featured articles include “T. J. and W. T.” (page 2), about patching up of differences between William Kemper, Sr. ("Democratic national committeeman for Missouri") and Tom Pendergast (Democratic No.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the Bond Advisory Committee of the Ten-Year Plan, made up of prominent Kansas Citians including R. Crosby Kemper and J. E. Woodmansee, and chaired by Conrad H. Mann. Other featured articles include: “The Sport of Kings” (p. 2), about the Riverside horse racing track and the machine-controlled gambling that takes place there; “Will They Be Able to Silence Mr. Bash?” (p.

Genre: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the escape from federal police in Kansas City of Sam Randazzo, "a St. Louis gangster" being released from Leavenworth, with the help of police officials Otto Higgins and Jeff Rayen. Other featured articles include: “Patriots Go to Riverside” (p.

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