Clark, Bennett C.

Displaying 49 - 60 of 139
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman reaffirms his aversion to those patronizing him: "For instance old man Porter, president of the Power and Light, wrote me the most patronizing letter you ever saw. I burned him to a cinder and mailed it while it was hot… The thing that makes me stronger than ever for F.D.R. is that most of these smart alecks tell me I'd better line up with Bennett."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Governor Clinton in New York City to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this candid letter, Truman updates Bess on his morning and his trip to New York, saying that "[John N. Garner, Nathan L. Bachman, and William J. Bulow] had been to see T.J. [Tom Pendergast] and I must try to find out what they did tomorrow."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman tells Bess of his meeting with President Roosevelt, Bennett C. Clark, and Clarence Cannon concerning relief for flood victims. Truman adds that, "I had a chance to tell Mr. Roosevelt what I thought of Mr. Mitchell. He very readily agreed with me."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at The Majestic in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. Written while Truman was attending the 1936 Democratic National Convention, Truman comments on several small details concerning the convention, including the fact that "Mrs. [Bennett C.] Clark was there and sat with the delegation--quite a concession as she had a box seat on the stage. I was given one for you but gave it to T.J. [Tom Pendergast]."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his visit with Franklin D. Roosevelt and their discussion about Lloyd C. Stark: "Went to see the President about a bill and he insisted on talking Mo. politics and telling me what a funny Governor we have. He didn't say phony but that's what he meant."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at The Majestic in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman gives Bess his opinion of the 1936 Democratic National Convention and mentions that James M. Pendergast was present. He also makes note that the date marks his seventeenth anniversary with Bess.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from James A. Reed to Bennett C. Clark. Reed states that he is not sure what he can accomplish concerning the Redistricting Bill, but says that he will speak with Thomas J. Pendergast on the matter. Reed then explains rumors of his endorsement of Harry Hawes.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Bennett C. Clark to James A. Reed in which he expresses his dismay of Reed's neutrality between Charles M. Howell and Clark's U.S. Senate campaign.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Frederick R. Barkhurst to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 18, 1935. Barkhurst praises Mitchell for his stance against Thomas J. Pendergast and encourages Mitchell to run for the next governor of Missouri.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Memo for the press containing a response from Governor Lloyd C. Stark to a report from the US Senate's Gillette Committee to Investigate Campaign Expenditures. Stark says the report proves that allegations against his camapign were "just another effort of the Pendergast remnants and their allies in the 'smear Stark movement' designed to put the Pendergast crowd back in control of Missouri."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from C. W. Greenwade to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 4, 1934. Greenwade inquires what candidate for U.S. Senate in Missouri he should openly support and comments that he believes John J. Cochran will when the primary.

Genre: 
Transcriptions

Press release containing the test of a statement given by William Hirth, publisher of the Missouri Farmer and president of the Missouri Farmers' Association, regarding the state Democratic convention. Hirth reports that the recent "convention in St. Louis was the most shameful gathering of its kind in the history of Missouri," and describes animosity between Clark-Pendergast forces and Governor Lloyd C. Stark.

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