Kitchen, William A.

Displaying 25 - 36 of 64

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, February 14, 1941

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen provides intelligence that if a Missourian were to be appointed as a new judge on the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals, it would be Charlie Carr. Kitchen refuses to give up on the endeavor as it may be June 1941 before the position is filled.

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, December 7, 1937

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen suggests a way in which Truman can put in a replacement for Maurice M. Milligan as U.S. attorney at Kansas City. Kitchen proposes that the President could appoint a new attorney of Truman's choosing, but keep Milligan as a special prosecutor for the Kansas City voter fraud cases. By doing so, Truman can control the placement without the Kansas City newspapers accusing him of trying to suppress the prosecution of voter fraud.

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, December 12, 1941

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen updates Truman on the recent "Democratic pow-wow" in Jefferson City, Missouri.

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, August 9, 1935

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen encourages Truman to give K. E. Long of Newburg, Missouri a job under Mr. Murray. Kitchen finds Long to be "well connected politically in Phelps County and I am, therefore, extremely anxious that he be placed on the payroll at the earliest possible date."

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, August 20, 1940

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses suitable candidates for state chairman and other details for Truman's 1940 Senate campaign. In his postscript he urges Truman to attend the American Legion convention on Labor Day in Sedalia, Missouri.

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, August 19, 1941

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses a number of Missouri political matters including possible state chairman replacements. He also provides intelligence concerning a secret political meeting held in the Lake of the Ozarks, Missouri. In attendance were Lloyd C. Stark, J. D. James, William E. Kemp, Edgar Shook, Andrew Murphy, et al..

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, August 14, 1935

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses Franklin D. Roosevelt's unpopularity among World War veterans. Kitchen suggests that the President must attend the American Legion National Convention in St. Louis that year if he intends to visit the following year during his reelection campaign.

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, August 13, 1940

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses Truman's victory as Democratic candidate for re-election in the Senate. He then provides suggestions for Truman's fall campaign strategy.

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, August 13, 1940

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen informs Truman he just saw Truman's good friend P. C. Carlock. Kitchen asks Truman to do what it takes to appoint Carlock to his desired position as sub-carrier at Greenfield, Missouri.

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, August 1, 1935

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses filling the position of Veterans' Placement Officer for the State of Missouri.

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, April 6, 1937

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen provides his opinion on two appointments to the Workmen's Compensation Commission and the political repercussions of the same. He also informs Truman of James M. Pendergast's opinion on the situation.

From P. C. Carlock to William A. Kitchen

Letter from P. C. Carlock to William A. Kitchen in which Carlock informs Kitchen of his desire to be the sub-carrier in Greenfield, Missouri. Carlock asks him if he may be able to help him procure the position.