Milligan, Maurice M.

Displaying 25 - 36 of 57
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman replies to Kitchen's letter concerning Milligan's campaign and a Securities and Exchange Commission investigation. He also inquires if Charlie Carr sent the required documents in his proposed appointment to Judge of the Eight Circuit Court of Appeals.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman responds to Kitchen's suggestion of a way for Truman to put in a replacement for Maurice M. Milligan as U.S. attorney at Kansas City.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Truman comments on the difficulties of the primary campaign and responds to Kitchens suggestions on the fall campaign.

Genre: 
Manuscripts

Harry S. Truman's final draft of his statement on the reappointment of Maurice Milligan as U.S. Attorney. Truman strongly opposes Milligan's reappointment because he finds him to be morally and professionally unqualified. Specifically, Truman takes issue with Milligan's selection of the petit jury in the 1936 election voter fraud cases where no residents of Jackson County or acquaintances of the same were allowed to take part. Truman comments on this saying, "I say to this Senate, Mr.

Genre: 
Pamphlets

Pamphlet written by Ewing Young Mitchell, former Assistant Secretary of Commerce in Franklin D. Roosevelt administration's first term. He asserts "[t]he first nomination for United States Senator of Harry S. Truman was stolen," and proceeds to argue that point. The Pendergast machine is described as "the most corrupt, the most brazen, gang of thieves who ever looted an American city," and describes the Pendergasts' businesses' activities and obstructions around the city.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Correspondence from Thomas Pendergast Jr. to Margaret Truman Daniel, likely dated after the 1973 publication of her biography about her father, Harry S. Truman. It is unclear if the note was ever delivered or if it remained in Pendergast Jr.'s possession. In it, Pendergast Jr. accuses Harry Truman and James M. Pendergast of betraying his father.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William Hirth, publisher and managing editor of The Missouri Farmer, to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on February 28, 1937. Hirth discusses Missouri politics ahead of the 1940 U.S. Senate campaign.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Transcript of the Court's Charge to the Grand Jury in case investigating election fraud in a 1936 election.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Gertrude Wyatt to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, describing calm and "no opposition workers in the field" during the recent election.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Charles L. Dunham to Jesse Barrett describing his political activities over the years and his opposition to the Pendergast Machine in Kansas City.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Statement by a rival of Lloyd Stark in the 1936 Democratic primary for governor. The writer states "when I entered the gubernatorial contest my only hope was that I might help to arouse the people of our State against the infamy of the Pendergast machine," and was concerned about Stark's endorsement by the Pendergast machine. In light of Stark's work to clean up government and elections, however, he states "my attitude for the Governor's courage has become one of unstinted admiration."

Genre: 
Clippings

St. Louis Star-Times article about the 1936 investigation into election fraud, including a sketch of Pendergast by Thomas Hart Benton. The article reports Pendergast "said today that he had been investigated so often that 'one more doesn't bother me much.'" He argued that he had no idea of any election fraud.

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