Mitchell, Ewing Young, Jr.

Displaying 13 - 24 of 107

From William Hirth to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr.

Letter from William Hirth, publisher and managing editor of The Missouri Farmer, to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on February 28, 1937. Hirth discusses Missouri politics ahead of the 1940 U.S. Senate campaign.

From Unknown to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr.

Letter from unknown to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on July 11, 1934. The author recounts John Lazia's death the day previous and provides an opinion on who may be at fault. Lazia's last words are recounted: "If anything is bad with me tell my friend Tom P. [Thomas J. Pendergast] I love him."

From Thomas McGee to Harry S. Truman

Letter from Thomas McGee to Harry S. Truman in which McGee discusses the removal of Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. from his appointment as assistant secretary of commerce in the Roosevelt Administration.

From T. O'Donnell to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr.

Letter from T. O'Donnell to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on December 5, 1934. O'Donnell reports that the St. Louis Star decided not to report the information on the Pendergast machine that O'Donnell provided to them. He also comments on the aftermath of the 1934 election and inquires if Mitchell could place him in an administrative position.

From T. O'Donnell to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr.

Letter from T. O'Donnell to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. in which O'Donnell informs Mitchell he will be sending a document describing "'Machine tactics' in Jackson County government." O'Donnell claims it would be useful information for any U.S. Senate candidate opposing the Pendergast Machine.

From T. O'Donnell to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr.

Letter from T. O'Donnell to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on May 20, 1934. O'Donnell comments on the Democratic candidates in the 1934 campaign for U.S. Senator of Missouri. He implicates Harry S. Truman, saying he "has been so faithful in following the dictates of the political machine, that they have promoted him and now are trying to name him senator from this state, knowing well that the machine interests will never suffer from his acts."

From Richard Perry Spencer to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr.

Letter from Richard Perry Spencer to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on February 1, 1932. Spencer believes that every Pendergast-endorsed candidate should be defeated in the upcoming primary. Otherwise, a precedent might form where candidates spend more time vying for the support of Pendergast than the support of the people.

From R. E. Joyce to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr.

Letter from R. E. Joyce to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on March 26, 1934. After Mitchell inquires if Thomas J. Pendergast received a license to distill spirits, Joyce clarifies that the Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Co. received a permit to rectify (purify) previously distilled spirits.

From Mrs. T. W. Marr to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr.

Letter from Mrs. T. W. Marr to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on May 16, 1934, with attached letter. Marr urges Mitchell to combat the corruption in Kansas City and comments how she was turned down for a job in Marshall, Missouri because she did not have Thomas J. Pendergast's endorsement.

From Martin J. Collins to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr.

Letter from Martin J. (M. J.) Collins to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on April 2, 1934. Collins laments the victory of the Pendergast machine in the recent Kansas City local election. He also comments on national political matters concerning Franklin D. Roosevelt.

From Marie Plummer to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr.

Letter from Marie Plummer to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on February 2, 1937. Plummer reports that a friend, Clif Langsdale, was able to extend her employment as deputy clerk at the Kansas City Court of Appeals potentially until August 1, 1937. She recounts a conversation she had with Bland in which Bland does not believe the court to be influenced by Pendergast since the machine does not dictate opinions. However, Plummer believes the court to be compromised since all recently hired employees come with a Pendergast endorsement.

From Marie Plummer to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr.

Letter from Marie Plummer to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on January 22, 1937. Plummer updates Mitchell on her conversation with Ewing C. Bland concerning Plummer's termination as clerk at the Kansas City Court of Appeals. She transmits Bland's response to Mitchell's most recent letter to him, communicating that using his influence to retain Plummer in her position would hurt his reelection campaign in the near future. Although Bland asserts he is not under any political influence, Plummer strongly disagrees and urges Mitchell not to further anger him.