Mitchell, Ewing Young, Jr.

Displaying 61 - 72 of 107
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Kansas City Court of Appeals judge, Ewing C. Bland, to his uncle on April 19, 1921. Bland comments in relation to his own political campaign that, "The Pendergast faction now seems the strongest and could no doubt control any delegation from this county."

Genre: 
Pamphlets

Pamphlet written by Ewing Young Mitchell, former Assistant Secretary of Commerce in Franklin D. Roosevelt administration's first term. He asserts "[t]he first nomination for United States Senator of Harry S. Truman was stolen," and proceeds to argue that point. The Pendergast machine is described as "the most corrupt, the most brazen, gang of thieves who ever looted an American city," and describes the Pendergasts' businesses' activities and obstructions around the city.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to George G. Vest on June 15, 1932. Mitchell informs Vest that he met with James P. Aylward, Jerome Welch, and Greenwade on behalf's of Vest's campaign for Congress. Mitchell says C. W. Greenwade will urge Thomas J. Pendergast to support Vest as well.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Marie Plummer on January 18, 1937. Mitchell confirms that he sent a letter to Judge Ewing C. Bland concerning Plummer's termination at the District Court of Appeals in Kansas City. He does not believe there is anything he can do in aiding Plummer's reinstatement there and cautions her about making threats. He says, "It would not cost over $50 to have you assassinated, and if you were[,] certainly nothing would be done about it." Mitchell then suggests that she should always be accompanied by someone.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from A. Ross Hill to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. in which Hill discusses prospective candidates for U.S. Senate in Missouri. With Harry S. Truman and Jacob L. Milligan being the two most likely Democratic candidates, Hill prefers Milligan for his anti-Pendergast stance.

Genre: 
Manuscripts

A ten page typewritten history of Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr.'s political career in relation to Missouri politics through 1935 when the President of the United States removed him from office.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from C. H. Williams to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on March 7, 1934. Williams praises Mitchell in his fight against the Pendergast machine and inquires if there is a vacancy in Franklin D. Roosevelt's administration that Williams could fill.

Genre: 
Manuscripts

Two-page typewritten article titled, "Hon. John T. Wayland Overrules the U. S. Supreme Court and Appoints a Democrat. - A Republican After Holding the Sinecure for Thirty Years Is Deposed - An Interesting Story from Washington" by an unknown author. Includes a vote tally from Kansas City wards and handwritten notes in Ewing Young Mitchell Jr.'s hand.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Senator Manvel H. Davis on August 15, 1940. Mitchell discusses the results of the 1940 primary election in Missouri and stresses the importance of an honest election in November.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Langdon W. Post, in which Mitchell requests Post's projection of the Kansas City election results. He believes that, "the Pendergast machine will be smashed if there is anything like an honest count of votes."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from A. Ross Hill to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. in which Hill discusses prospective candidates for U.S. Senate in Missouri.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to George G. Vest on July 9, 1932. Mitchell informs Vest of C. W. Greenwade's belief that Thomas J. Pendergast will not support more than 7-8 candidates for Congress. Thus, Mitchell suggests that Vest seeks the support of other Kansas City leaders in his campaign.

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