Murray, Matthew S.

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U.S. vs. Matthew S. Murray: Sentencing

Sentencing in Criminal Case No. 14652: United States vs. Matthew S. Murray, defendant. Judge Albert L. Reeves notes that Murray was a successful man of good reputation, who permitted himself "to be drawn into an atmosphere and an environment of low standards" and "forsook the people it was his duty to faithfully serve." He sentences Murray to two years in a penitentiary "of the type of that at Leavenworth, Kansas" in each of the five counts, but orders that the sentences all run concurrently for a total of two years' imprisonment.

U.S. vs. Matthew S. Murray: Opening Statement of Maurice M. Milligan

U.S. Attorney Maurice M. Milligan's opening statement in Criminal Case No. 14652: United States vs. Matthew S. Murray, defendant. Milligan notes that Murray filed tax returns in each of those years, for considerably less than his actual income, i.e. reporting net income of $3,500.85 in 1935, but actually receiving $14,576.88, and that he defrauded the government out of $6,577.29 in total over those five years.

U.S. vs. Matthew S. Murray: Judgment and Commitment

Judgment and commitment in Criminal Case No. 14652: United States vs. Matthew S. Murray, defendant. Murray was the Director of Public Works for Kansas City, Missouri, and Missouri Administrator of the Works Progress Administration, and was found guilty at trial on charges of tax evasion for the years 1935-1938, and sentenced to two years in the penitentiary for each of five counts, but all to be served concurrently.

U.S. vs. Matthew S. Murray: Judgment

Judgment in Criminal Case No. 14652: United States vs. Matthew S. Murray, defendant. Judge Albert L. Reeves' statement addresses the issue of whether certain payments are to be considered gifts, as the defendant claims, or compensation, which would be taxable, says that the deciding factor between the two is the intention of the parties involved, and suggests further inquiry into that question is required. Those payments were made by John J. Pryor, E. L. Schneider, and T. J.

U.S. vs. Matthew S. Murray: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14652: United States vs. Matthew S. Murray, defendant. Murray was the Director of Public Works for Kansas City, Missouri, and Missouri Administrator of the Works Progress Administration, and was charged in five counts with income tax evasion for the years 1934-1938. The indictment catalogs his sources of income and taxes paid for those years, as well as the outstanding tax amounts. Income sources include John J. Pryor, a Pendergast-affiliated contractor.

The Four Horsemen of the Pendergast Machine

Pamphlet written by Ewing Young Mitchell, former Assistant Secretary of Commerce in Franklin D. Roosevelt administration's first term. He first responds to Harry Truman's statement to a reporter that "he never had sought the support of the Pendergast political organization in Missouri" and that the Pendergast machine was not involved in scandal until after he was elected to the Senate.

Longhand Note of Judge Harry S. Truman

A longhand note written by Harry S. Truman while he was a judge for Jackson County, Missouri. In this note, Truman exposes many of the names and relations of those involved with the Pendergast machine in Kansas City. Although supported by Pendergast, Truman comments on the machine thusly: "What chance is there for a clean honest administration of the city and county when a bunch vultures sit on the side lines and puke on the field[?]."

Future: Vol. II, No. 2

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a notice that Future’s publishers plan to temporarily suspend publication to reorganize the paper, and also note that “youth is interested and youth is organizing,” and “FUTURE is their paper.” Other featured articles include: “Why Charge a Cover?” (p.

Future: Vol. II, No. 1

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the “lug,” “an involuntary or forced contribution to something a luckless employee isn’t nearly as interested in” as his and his family’s own welfare. Other featured articles include “T. J. and W. T.” (page 2), about patching up of differences between William Kemper, Sr. ("Democratic national committeeman for Missouri") and Tom Pendergast (Democratic No.

Future: Vol. I, No. 26

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about crime in Kansas City, the lack of accurate, trustworthy records about its frequency and location, and the city’s “inefficient, politically-controlled police department.” Other featured articles include: “Mister Welching” (p.

Future: Vol. I, No. 25

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the Bond Advisory Committee of the Ten-Year Plan, made up of prominent Kansas Citians including R. Crosby Kemper and J. E. Woodmansee, and chaired by Conrad H. Mann. Other featured articles include: “The Sport of Kings” (p. 2), about the Riverside horse racing track and the machine-controlled gambling that takes place there; “Will They Be Able to Silence Mr. Bash?” (p.

Future: Vol. I, No. 24

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about J. C. Nichols and his city planning projects in Kansas City with the Country Club residential district and Country Club Plaza shopping center, etc., including a photo of Nichols. Other featured articles include: “To Better Serve His Clients” (p.