Murray, Matthew S.

Displaying 25 - 36 of 53
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his latest political maneuvers with Bennett C. Clark: "Mr. Clark and I have had a time trying to get to the W.P.A. office to recommend a man for [Matthew S.] Murray's place. It looks as if they would really put poor old Murray in the jug."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman tells Bess of his meeting with President Roosevelt, Bennett C. Clark, and Clarence Cannon concerning relief for flood victims. Truman adds that, "I had a chance to tell Mr. Roosevelt what I thought of Mr. Mitchell. He very readily agreed with me."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his endeavor to select the new Kansas City W.P.A. Director and then comments about those affiliated with the Pendergast machine: "Mr. [Matthew S.] Murray, Mr. [Henry F.] McElroy, Mr. [Otto P.] Higgins, and even Mr. [Tom] P. himself probably would pay all the ill-gotten loot they took for my position and clear conscience."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Anonymous letter to Governor Stark congratulating him on efforts to remove Matt Murray from oversight of the state W.P.A. The author also alerts the Governor to another potential scandal involving a W. P. A. construction project in Kansas City.

From Joseph A. Taranto to Governor Stark
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter describing the corrupt practices of the WPA offices in Kansas City, under the direction of Matt Murray.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Charles Matthews to Claude Lambert asserting that Lloyd Stark will not be beholden to Tom Pendergast's interests, regardless of garnering his endorsement. This letter is a near replica of SHSMO-C0004-F08113-0001.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter to Claude Lambert asserting that gubernatorial candidate Lloyd Stark is not beholden or affiliated to the Kansas City political machine, and making complimentary remarks about Matthew S. Murray and Henry McElroy.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Jimmy Hurst to Lloyd C. Stark, reporting on a meeting he had with Tom Pendergast. Hurst writes that Pendergast said he would support whichever candidate for governor came out on top, and Hurst believes that Stark is likely to be that man.

Genre: 
Correspondence
Clippings

Letter that describe retaliation against a Kansas City employee who had collaborated with reformers, and including a St. Louis Star-Times clipping advocating the ouster of Matthew S. Murray as the state WPA director.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Walker C. Johnson to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, lauding Stark for his "stand for RIGHT in the State of M[issouri]." He writes that many of his county opposed Stark due to his Pendergast support, but that now "most of them are behind you on this [war] to rid the State of the rascals in elections." He also describes losing his job due to political affiliation.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Walker C. Johnson to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, lauding Stark for his "stand for RIGHT in the State of M[issouri]." He writes that many of his county opposed Stark due to his Pendergast support, but that now "most of them are behind you on this [war] to rid the State of the rascals in elections." He also describes losing his job due to political affiliation.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ruth Vawter to Governor Lloyd C. Stark. Vawter writes regarding Mrs. Marie S. Barnhill, former Area Supervisor of Women's Work for the WPA in Webster County. Barnhill's successor "is making her brags that she can deliver Saline County in the palm of her hand to the Organization for Judge Billings," and Vawter suggests that Barnhill, who is not currently allied to either Supreme Court candidate, could support Douglas "should [Stark] be able to help her."

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