Otis, Merrill E.

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Harry S. Truman's final draft of his statement on the reappointment of Maurice Milligan as U.S. Attorney. Truman strongly opposes Milligan's reappointment because he finds him to be morally and professionally unqualified.

Letter and document written by Jesse Barrett providing a positive accounting of the career of U.S. District Judge Merrill E. Otis of Kansas City.

Clipping from the Sunday Washington Star by O. K. Armstrong describing the Pendergast machine and efforts to take them down ahead of a March 1938 election.

Letter from I. N. Watson to Jesse Barrett describing his attempts to counteract and prosecute voting fraud during the 1936 election in Kansas City.

Transcript of the Court's Charge to the Grand Jury in case investigating election fraud in a 1936 election.

Draft campaign materials for the James Douglas for Supreme Court campaign, including a statement written by Governor Lloyd C. Stark asserting that "the same political boss and the organization he dominates ... are trying to extend their sinister influence to our Supreme Court."

Letter from Robert Locke, Kansas City Journal-Post science editor, to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, requesting Stark's approval to start a "Stark for President" Club. He also writes of R.

Letter from I. N. Watson to Jesse Barrett describing the pleas of those accused of election fraud in Kansas City,

Pamphlet written by Ewing Young Mitchell, former Assistant Secretary of Commerce in Franklin D. Roosevelt administration's first term. He asserts "[t]he first nomination for United States Senator of Harry S. Truman was stolen," and proceeds to argue that point.

Anonymous postcard accusing Kansas City officials of misdeeds.

Remarks of the court on Thursday, February 25, 1937, before imposing sentences for Criminal Case No. 13650: United States vs. Callie Clark, Lorne E. Wells, Frank H. Adams, Joe R. Wells, Jr., Pearl Sperry, John A. Luteran, and Leo B. Roach, Defendants.

Judgement and sentence for Criminal Case No. 13676: United States vs. Samuel J. Clark, Marie Ogden, Myrtle E. Middleton, Joseph Maher, Herbert Campbell, and Don Depasco, Defendants. The document states that Ogden, Middleton, Maher, Campbell, and Depasco were found guilty and that Clark had pleaded nolo contendere ("no contest").

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