Pendergast, Thomas J.

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U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Capias

Capias for Criminal Case No. 14912: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. This capias commands H. L. Dillingham, U.S. Marshal, to arrest the three defendants. Dillingham certifies on the back of the document that he procured Pendergast and O'Malley, but was unable to find McCormack.

U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Affidavit of Bias and Prejudice

Affidavit of bias and prejudice for Criminal Case No. 14937: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this affidavit, Pendergast claims that Judge Merrill E. Otis has a personal bias and prejudice against the defendant. Since Otis is also a judge in the cases Pendergast has illegal involvement in, Pendergast claims a personal bias.

U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Affidavit of Bias and Prejudice

Affidavit of bias and prejudice for Criminal Case No. 14912: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this affidavit, Pendergast claims that Judge Merrill E. Otis has a personal bias and prejudice against the defendant. Since Otis is also a judge in the cases Pendergast has illegal involvement in, Pendergast claims a personal bias.

U.S. vs. Robert Emmet O'Malley: Order and Memorandum

Order detailing O'Malley's probation for Criminal Case No. 14459: United States vs. Robert Emmet O'Malley, Defendant. In this document, Judge Merrill E. Otis outlines the details of O'Malley's probation followed by a memorandum that clarifies custody and parole conditions of the defendant.

U.S. vs. Robert Emmet O'Malley: Notes Concerning Sentence of Defendant

Considerations for the decision of sentence for Criminal Case No. 14459: United States vs. Robert Emmet O'Malley, Defendant. In this document, Judge Merrill E. Otis reviews the sentence that he imposed upon T. J. Pendergast in Criminal Case No. 14458, so that Otis may more accurately sentence Robert Emmet O'Malley in the present case.

U.S. vs. Matthew S. Murray: Judgment

Judgment in Criminal Case No. 14652: United States vs. Matthew S. Murray, defendant. Judge Albert L. Reeves' statement addresses the issue of whether certain payments are to be considered gifts, as the defendant claims, or compensation, which would be taxable, says that the deciding factor between the two is the intention of the parties involved, and suggests further inquiry into that question is required. Those payments were made by John J. Pryor, E. L. Schneider, and T. J.

Truman-Stark-Milligan

Southeastern Missouri newspaper clipping reporting on Governor Lloyd C. Stark's campaign announcement for U.S. Senator of Missouri. The author favors Senator Harry S. Truman for reelection as he is believed to have a better chance of beating a Republican nominee over his Democratic rivals Stark and Maurice M. Milligan. The author then paints a favorable portrait of Truman and tells the reader to not fear his association with Pendergast, saying, "Don't be foolish enough to vote against him [Truman] just because Tom Pendergast was for him.

Truman's First Nomination for Senator was Stolen

Pamphlet written by Ewing Young Mitchell, former Assistant Secretary of Commerce in Franklin D. Roosevelt administration's first term. He asserts "[t]he first nomination for United States Senator of Harry S. Truman was stolen," and proceeds to argue that point. The Pendergast machine is described as "the most corrupt, the most brazen, gang of thieves who ever looted an American city," and describes the Pendergasts' businesses' activities and obstructions around the city.

Truman with Tom Pendergast and others

Senator Harry S. Truman, Thomas J. Pendergast, James P. Aylward, James Farley, N. G. Robertson, and David Fitzgerald at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Truman at Tom Pendergast Funeral

Photograph of Harry S. Truman speaking to James Pendergast following Tom Pendergast's funeral.

Trip to Europe Curtailed

Photograph with caption, describing Thomas J. Pendergast's abrupt decision to end his tour of Europe because of the illness of his wife, Carolyn Elizabeth Pendergast.

Tom Pendergast: "Why Not Talk It Over?"

Clipping entitled "'Why Not Talk It Over?'" from the Kansas City Journal-Post on June 19, 1937 with caption stating, "'Instead of having mass meetings,' T. J. Pendergast (shown above) told a group of the city's business leaders Saturday, 'Why don’t you men name a committee of employers to represent you and have that committee sit across the table from a committee of union labor representatives? I think you will accomplish a lot more if you thresh this thing out calmly and peacefully.'"