Shannon, Joseph B.

Displaying 37 - 48 of 69
Genre: 
Essays

Essay documenting the relationship between the author's father Alex Sachs and Harry S. Truman. The author addresses their first meeting, Pendergast Machine involvement, and immigration of family members from Germany to the United States. Howard Sachs also includes details of their relationship post-World War II.

Genre: 
Essays

Essay documenting the role Ralph E. Truman and Olive L. Truman played in the 1934 U.S. Senatorial campaign in Missouri. Olive details how her and her husband helped Jacob L. Milligan with his campaign before learning that Ralph's cousin Harry S. Truman would enter as well. The two had committed themselves to the Milligan campaign and could not aid Harry. Olive also details tactics used by the Pendergast Organization during this campaign.

Genre: 
Narratives

A longhand note written by Harry S. Truman while he was a judge for Jackson County, Missouri. In this note, Truman exposes many of the names and relations of those involved with the Pendergast machine in Kansas City. Although supported by Pendergast, Truman comments on the machine thusly: "What chance is there for a clean honest administration of the city and county when a bunch vultures sit on the side lines and puke on the field[?]."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides the latest information concerning Kansas City and Missouri politics: "I missed a call from [Joseph B.] Shannon... Jim P. [Pendergast] said he hoped I'd keep him here but I'm glad he's going home. He says [Lloyd C.] Stark will run against [Bennett C.] Clark and not against me."

Genre: 
Clippings

An article by Kenneth P. Middleton entitled "Democratic Rift Widens Over Jobs", included in the Kansas City Journal issue of July 30, 1940. The article concerns a disagreement between democratic factions in Kansas City as to which democratic candidates to endorse. The clipping also includes a separate article that provides information on Harry S. Truman's upcoming rally that night at the Municipal Auditorium in Kansas City, Missouri.

Genre: 
Narratives

A longhand note written by Harry S. Truman while he was a judge for Jackson County, Missouri. In this note, Truman writes of his career in politics in Kansas City and of Tom Pendergast. Truman says of him, "I am obligated to the Big Boss, a man of his word; but he gives it very seldom and usually on a sure thing. But he's not a trimmer. He, in times past owned a bawdy house, a saloon and gambling establishment; was raised in that environment, but he's all man. I wonder who's worth more in the sight of the Lord?"

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides details on Clark and Truman's political maneuvering: "Clark said he was to see Tuck [Jacob] Milligan yesterday and that he'd rub a little salt on Stark. He thinks maybe we can get 'em all in the race."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from James A. Reed to Tom Pendergast regarding a conversation with Joe Shannon about Mr. Kingsley (probably George Kingsley).

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Hugh O'Connor to Guy B. park demanding an investigation into the August 4, 1936 primary election and the ouster of the election commissioners and election judges and clerks.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from J. M. Harper to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. in which Harper discusses Thomas J. Pendergast's influence on the 1936 primary election in Missouri.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from G. H. Foree to Ewing young Mitchell, Jr. on May 9, 1934. Foree warns of Republican attacks on the Democratic administration in power and requests information concerning candidates for U.S. Senator in Missouri.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Spencer Salisbury to Governor Lloyd C. Stark discussing the election board and voter registration in Eastern Jackson County ahead of the Douglas-Billings Supreme Court vote.

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