Stark, Lloyd C.

Displaying 13 - 24 of 808
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Mattie Acock to Ruby Carr at the Justice Department regarding Tom Pendergast. Acock writes that Pendergast is a "good man" who gave her husband a job and has been "so good to the poor people," and she hopes he "will get to come home right away. She also writes at length about being poor and her other difficulties. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Mattie Acock to President Franklin D. Roosevelt regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Acock writes asking for Roosevelt to support Pendergast's parole, and says that Governor Lloyd Stark is mad because Pendergast got former governor Guy B.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Memorandum from W. Harold Lane, Internal Revenue Service Special Agent, to the Special Agent in Charge (elsewhere identified as Charles O'B. Berry), regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The memo reports that, in a discussion with Governor Lloyd Stark about the conviction of Charles Gargotta for assault of Sheriff Thomas Bash, Stark stated that he suspected that Pendergast was "directing his political organization" while in prison.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from James V. Bennett, Director of the Bureau of Prisons, to Robert Hudspeth, warden of the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Bennett writes regarding allegations made by Governor Lloyd Stark that Pendergast "was directing his political organization from Leavenworth," and his discussion about that issue with Elmer Irey, who works in Treasury Department law enforcement. Irey concluded that Stark was misinformed, and that Pendergast was not engaged in political activity from prison.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Special Agent in Charge Charles O'B. Berry to W. H. Woolf, acting chief of the Intelligence Unit of the Bureau of Internal Revenue, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Berry addresses the concerns of Governor Lloyd C. Stark that Pendergast was engaged in his political machine while serving his sentence in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, in violation of the terms of his conviction.

Genre: 
Pamphlets

Pamphlet is support of Maurice M. Milligan for U.S. Senator of Missouri. Milligan ran in opposition to current Senator Harry S. Truman and lost the primary because the anti-Pendergast vote was split between Milligan and Lloyd C. Stark.

Genre: 
Clippings

Southeastern Missouri newspaper clipping reporting on Governor Lloyd C. Stark's campaign announcement for U.S. Senator of Missouri. The author favors Senator Harry S. Truman for reelection as he is believed to have a better chance of beating a Republican nominee over his Democratic rivals Stark and Maurice M. Milligan. The author then paints a favorable portrait of Truman and tells the reader to not fear his association with Pendergast, saying, "Don't be foolish enough to vote against him [Truman] just because Tom Pendergast was for him.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Fred Canfil to Harry S. Truman in which Canfil presents a way to sway the vote of the WPA workers for the upcoming primary election by speaking critically of Lloyd C. Stark.

Genre: 
Essays

Essay documenting the relationship between the author's father Alex Sachs and Harry S. Truman. The author addresses their first meeting, Pendergast Machine involvement, and immigration of family members from Germany to the United States. Howard Sachs also includes details of their relationship post-World War II.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from J. W. Thompson to Governor Lloyd C. Stark concerning social security pensions and Thompson's view of Missouri politicians. He admits he does not like Bennett C. Clark, but as an anti-Pendergast voter, Thompson believes "Clark is better than Truman at his best."

Genre: 
Essays

Essay documenting the role Ralph E. Truman and Olive L. Truman played in the 1940 U.S. Senatorial campaign in Missouri. Olive describes how Governor Lloyd C. Stark asked for Ralph's support for Stark's senatorial campaign, as Stark had recently appointed Ralph to a General. After Ralph put his support towards the reelection of his cousin Senator Harry S. Truman, Stark attempted to have Ralph's status as General revoked. In response, Ralph, Olive, and Bennett C. Clark resolved to get another Democratic candidate to enter to decrease Stark's chance of nomination.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess of his upcoming plans and comments on the newspapers' opinion of Lloyd C. Stark': "The K.C. Star, the Post-Dispatch, and the Star-Times in St. Louis are giving Mr. Stark dig after dig. It looks as if their hero has feet of clay (or rotten apples)."

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