Stark, Lloyd C.

Displaying 25 - 36 of 808
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his morning, including a meeting with Boyle Clark. When inquired about Missouri Governor Lloyd C. Stark, Truman said to Boyle Clark, "... I hadn't and didn't want to hear from the S.O.B. and that so far as I am concerned I didn't give a damn what he did or intended to do..."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides the latest information concerning Kansas City and Missouri politics: "I missed a call from [Joseph B.] Shannon... Jim P. [Pendergast] said he hoped I'd keep him here but I'm glad he's going home. He says [Lloyd C.] Stark will run against [Bennett C.] Clark and not against me."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen informs Truman that he spoke with Col. Bob Walton of Armstrong, Missouri. After explaining Truman's side of the story concerning the WPA issue, Kitchen reports that Walton agrees with Truman, but is still worried about the Democratic party in the 1940 campaign.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides some candid information concerning Kansas City and Missouri politics: "…[Bennett C.] Clark has definitely lined up with the Boss [Tom Pendergast] you see. He and Maurice Milligan almost came to blows the last time they met and now the Pres and [Lloyd C.] Stark are thinking of running him for Senator against Clark."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman states he is glad that Walton and Kitchen had a agreeable discussion concerning the WPA controversy. He then comments on how rural carrier positions are filled, including the one currently open in Ash Grove, Missouri.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his travel and then provides information on the Missouri public's current opinion of Governor Lloyd C. Stark: "There are a number of letters from all over the state giving the governor a real dressing down. One calls him Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde-for T.J.P. to get elected and against him to get headlines."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses the 1940 election and public reception to Maurice M. Milligan's campaign against Truman. Kitchen then details information he received concerning a Securities and Exchange Commission investigation of Andy Murphy and the Union Electric Company.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his travel and speaks about Kansas City Bar Association President Henry Depping: "Depping is a Republican and one of the inner circle in K.C. He told me he'd try to get enough Republican candidates into the Senatorial race so they wouldn't vote in my primary."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen informs Truman of invitation to speak on Truman's behalf at a League of Missouri voters reception. Kitchen believes it is best to decline the offer as it would allow Truman's campaign opponent Lloyd C. Stark to criticize Truman and his connection to the Kansas City organization.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides his opinion on Maurice M. Milligan and Lloyd C. Stark: "I don't want Milligan to run unless he and Stark run together. That would be too good."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman replies to Kitchen's invitation to speak on Truman's behalf at a League of Missouri voters reception. Truman respectfully disagrees with Kitchen's suggestion to decline the invitation as it might allow Lloyd C. Stark to criticize Truman and his connection to the Kansas City organization. Truman believes that there is nothing for Kitchen nor Dan Carr to hide in their support of Truman.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides details on Clark and Truman's political maneuvering: "Clark said he was to see Tuck [Jacob] Milligan yesterday and that he'd rub a little salt on Stark. He thinks maybe we can get 'em all in the race."

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