Truman, Harry S.

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Questionaire, No. 1 for Judge Truman

A flyer that seeks to disparage Harry S. Truman in his 1924 campaign for re-election as Judge of Jackson County. The document lists seven questions directed towards Harry S. Truman for the reader to consider before voting. The unnamed "Publicity Committee" implies that all important decisions made by Truman are first approved by the Pendergast Machine.

Pendergast Family Attending Truman Inaugural Gala

Mr. James Pendergast (third from left) is photographed at President Harry S. Truman's inaugural gala at the National Guard Armory in Washington, D.C. Pendergast's wife, Kathleen (fourth from left), and daughter, Mary Ellen Pendergast (unknown position), are also present along with two unidentified women.

Officers & Directors of Community Savings and Loan Association of Missouri

Collection of portrait photographs of the officers and directors of the Community Savings and Loan Association of Missouri. Pictured are Homer L. Rogers, Robert W. Barr, Lou E. Holland, M. T. Colgan, V. N. Adamson, F. E. Garman, H. H. Halvorson, Harry S. Truman, Arthur S. Metzger, Spencer Salisbury, James H. Clinton, Joseph Cartella, C. C. Daniel, Vera Holland Henthorn, and R. F. Crawford.

Missouri "Machine Busting"

Clipping from Time (magazine) on February 22, 1937 detailing the election fraud that occured in Kansas City during the 1936 General Election. The article features extended quotes from Judge Albert L. Reeves concerning the election fraud, including the following: "We can't surrender the ballot boxes to thugs, gangsters and plug-uglies who patrol the streets with machine guns. We can't stand for that any longer." The article then provides a history of political corruption in Kansas City through 1936.

Miss May Lowe seated in Truman campaign car

Miss May Lowe seated in the campaign "sound" car for Harry S. Truman's 1934 senatorial campaign. From an album of campaign pictures from October 1 to November 3, 1934, presented to Senator Harry S. Truman by Urso W. George and Bentley Morrow. This album was from the Truman home.

Memo to Doris Fleeson on William Marshall Boyle Jr.

A short biography and profile of William Marshall Boyle, Jr. made for journalist Doris Fleeson. Boyle was the Pendergast precinct captain of the 8th Ward in Kansas City and then appointed by Mayor Bryce B. Smith to Director of the Kansas City Police Department.

Memo for the Press

Memo for the press containing a response from Governor Lloyd C. Stark to a report from the US Senate's Gillette Committee to Investigate Campaign Expenditures. Stark says the report proves that allegations against his camapign were "just another effort of the Pendergast remnants and their allies in the 'smear Stark movement' designed to put the Pendergast crowd back in control of Missouri."

Maurice M. Milligan for U.S. Senator

Pamphlet is support of Maurice M. Milligan for U.S. Senator of Missouri. Milligan ran in opposition to current Senator Harry S. Truman and lost the primary because the anti-Pendergast vote was split between Milligan and Lloyd C. Stark.

Longhand Note of Judge Harry S. Truman

A longhand note written by Harry S. Truman while he was a judge for Jackson County, Missouri. In this note, Truman provides a character sketch of fellow Jackson County judge Thomas B. Bash and describes political activity in Kansas City between 1928 and 1931.

Longhand Note of Judge Harry S. Truman

A longhand note written by Harry S. Truman while he was a judge for Jackson County, Missouri. In this note, Truman provides a character sketch of fellow Jackson County judges Howard J. Vrooman and Robert W. Barr. Truman comments that "I got a lot of good legislation for Jackson Co. over while they [Vrooman and Barr] shot craps... By having a good host [Vrooman] and a man with an inferiority complex [Barr] I was able to expend $7,000,000.00 for the taxpayers benefit. At the same time I gave away about a million in general revenue to satisfy the politicians."

Longhand Note of Judge Harry S. Truman

A longhand note written by Harry S. Truman while he was a judge for Jackson County, Missouri. In this note, Truman writes of his career in politics in Kansas City and of Tom Pendergast. Truman says of him, "I am obligated to the Big Boss, a man of his word; but he gives it very seldom and usually on a sure thing. But he's not a trimmer. He, in times past owned a bawdy house, a saloon and gambling establishment; was raised in that environment, but he's all man. I wonder who's worth more in the sight of the Lord?"

Longhand Note of Judge Harry S. Truman

A longhand note written by Harry S. Truman while he was a judge for Jackson County, Missouri. In this note, Truman exposes many of the names and relations of those involved with the Pendergast machine in Kansas City. Although supported by Pendergast, Truman comments on the machine thusly: "What chance is there for a clean honest administration of the city and county when a bunch vultures sit on the side lines and puke on the field[?]."