Truman, Harry S.

Displaying 349 - 360 of 442

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, February 21, 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman reaffirms his aversion to those patronizing him: "For instance old man Porter, president of the Power and Light, wrote me the most patronizing letter you ever saw. I burned him to a cinder and mailed it while it was hot… The thing that makes me stronger than ever for F.D.R. is that most of these smart alecks tell me I'd better line up with Bennett."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, February 12, 1931

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Lafayette in Little Rock, Arkansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and comments that many people in Jackson County, Missouri are asking him for favors, saying that, "...the finances of the county were never in such shape since Miles Bulger handled them, and every person I've ever had any association with since birth has wanted me to take pity on him and furnish him some county money without much return."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, February 11, 1927

Letter from Harry S. Truman aboard the National Limited (Baltimore & Ohio Railroad) to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess of his entitlements during the trip: "Davis suggests that I inform you of all the tricks we are entitled to on this Limited whether we use them or not; such as maid, hairdresser, barber shop & bath, secretary, valet, tailor etc. etc. ad infinitum."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, February 10, 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess that he declined an offer from Lucky. He says, "Wouldn't my friends, who know my love for cigarettes, have a grand time wondering how much it takes to buy me[?]"

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, December 9, 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Carroll Arms Hotel in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his recent travels including a meeting with Roy A. Roberts, president and editor of The Kansas City Star. Truman says that "Both Mr. Stark & Mr. Milligan were in Roy Roberts room when Charlie and I made the rounds and they both looked and acted like men without a country."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, December 6, 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then recounts the dinner he had with railroad lobbyist Jim Nugent: "In fact I think everyone has a right to be heard if you expect to get all the facts. Of course it is the job of some people to befog the issue and cover up the facts. I don't put Jim in that class."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, December 15, 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman finds himself disconnected with Kansas City, but not by choice. Truman says that "It is a miserable state of affairs when a man dreads showing up in his home town because all his friends are either in jail or about to go there... The Star and even Willie never fail to emphasize my friendship with people whom they think may be a detriment politically to me."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, December 12, 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his past week and of the telegrams he received that morning, one from Tom Pendergast "recommending a good for nothing bird for a job and I won't recommend him."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, August 9, 1940

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman discusses his 1940 campaign for Senate reelection: "I wished then I'd never made the fight. But it was a good fight... I hope some good fact-finder will make a record of that campaign. It will be history someday."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, August 8, 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his visit with Franklin D. Roosevelt and their discussion about Lloyd C. Stark: "Went to see the President about a bill and he insisted on talking Mo. politics and telling me what a funny Governor we have. He didn't say phony but that's what he meant."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, August 6, 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then recounts one man's opinion of the Missouri political climate: "Had a letter from J. John Gillis this morning in which he said the Dems in Mo couldn't win unless Stark was nominated for V.P. He's a crazy Republican lawyer in K.C."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, August 26, 1933

Letter from Harry S. Truman at Camp Pike near Little Rock, Arkansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his free time at Camp Pike and his meeting with Arkansas ex-governor Charles Hillman Brough, "who is a friend of Pendergast's and who was very pleased to see me when he found I knew him."