Truman, Harry S.

Displaying 49 - 60 of 446
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman to Thomas McGee in which Truman states that McGee's son-in-law, John Lillis, should soon be re-appointed at the Federal Housing Administration. Truman then expresses his sorrow for the death of James A. Shannon, a Kansas City lawyer who passed away on May 16, 1936.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Thomas McGee to Harry S. Truman in which McGee thanks Truman for giving an appointment to Norman Bowes, saying that it will likely increase support in the Stockyards. McGee acknowledges Truman's receipt of a picture of Thomas J. Pendergast that he sent to Truman. He then updates Truman on a meeting Pendergast calls for that morning.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman's secretary V. R. Messall to Raymond H. Geist, American Consul General in Berlin, Germany. Attached is an affidavit of support by Alex F. Sachs for the family of Paul Matzdorff for immigration to the United States from Berlin, Germany.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry Easley to Harry S. Truman in which Easley urges Truman not to give Fred Black, Jr. a political appointment. Easley notes that Black "tells me that Jim Pendergast and Shannon Douglass are going to insist that you help him get this appointment."

Genre: 
Essays

Essay documenting the relationship between the author's father Alex Sachs and Harry S. Truman. The author addresses their first meeting, Pendergast Machine involvement, and immigration of family members from Germany to the United States. Howard Sachs also includes details of their relationship post-World War II.

Genre: 
Pamphlets

Pamphlet is support of Maurice M. Milligan for U.S. Senator of Missouri. Milligan ran in opposition to current Senator Harry S. Truman and lost the primary because the anti-Pendergast vote was split between Milligan and Lloyd C. Stark.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Rufus B. Burrus to Jack Alexander, a St. Louis Post Dispatch writer who had written an article critizing Senator Harry S. Truman entitled "Missouri Dark Mule". Burrus responds to accusations that Truman is a Pendergast "yes-man" and that he won because of voter fraud.

Genre: 
Narratives

A longhand note written by Harry S. Truman while he was a judge for Jackson County, Missouri. In this note, Truman recounts his childhood and early adulthood. Notable events described include his construction of the Jackson County Courthouse, his start in politics, and his family history.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides some candid information concerning Kansas City and Missouri politics: "…[Bennett C.] Clark has definitely lined up with the Boss [Tom Pendergast] you see. He and Maurice Milligan almost came to blows the last time they met and now the Pres and [Lloyd C.] Stark are thinking of running him for Senator against Clark."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on the political maneuvering of Maurice M. Milligan and Bennett C. Clark and mentions that "Then Canfil came in with a whole string of trouble which I got straightened out to some extent and now John Madden and R.R. Brewster are here on a parole for Pendergast."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen provides suggestions on how to secure Charlie Carr as the new judge of the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. Kitchen suggests Truman talks to his close friends, Senator Byrnes and Attorney General Jackson, both of which are recent appointments to the Supreme Court. Kitchen provides reasons why Byrnes and Jackson might want to help them in their efforts.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess that he declined an offer from Lucky. He says, "Wouldn't my friends, who know my love for cigarettes, have a grand time wondering how much it takes to buy me[?]"

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