Truman, Harry S.

Displaying 73 - 84 of 446
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman to his fiancée Bess Wallace while Truman was at Camp La Baholle, near Verdun, France. Truman gives insight into his personality as a leader, stating that, "If there's one thing I've always hated in a man it is to see him take his spite out on someone who couldn't talk back to him.".

Genre: 
Photographs

Miss May Lowe seated in the campaign "sound" car for Harry S. Truman's 1934 senatorial campaign. From an album of campaign pictures from October 1 to November 3, 1934, presented to Senator Harry S. Truman by Urso W. George and Bentley Morrow. This album was from the Truman home.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from WWI veteran E. B. Young to Harry S. Truman in which Young proclaims his support in Truman's campaign for Judge of Jackson County. Young comments on the Kansas City Post criticizing Truman, saying that "it is the dirtiest little trick any one could do to you...".

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from an anonymous democrat to Judge Harry S. Truman. This woman states her belief that new telephone operators should be employed at the Independence, Missouri Court House. She states, "Just because they have some friend politician is no reason they should stay in office forever."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman expresses his distaste for social functions, commenting that "I don't do things for people for a reward, if I did I ought to be rich. I do it because I like to do it, but if they just keep harping on it I get sick of it."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Council Grove, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his travels and informs her of the how well he is being treated, saying that, "You should be along. I haven't spent a nickle [sic] and I can't. They won't let me[.] even the phone call was free."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman provides his personal account of the Grand Lodge of Missouri Convention in Saint Louis, Missouri and his successful election to Deputy Master. Truman says, "If my friends hadn't put forth such an effort for me I'd have told 'em to go to hell with the office - and I almost did anyway. I'm glad now I didn't."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from L. P. Presler to William A. Kitchen in which Presler responds to Kitchen's letter campaigning on behalf of Truman. After addressing Kitchen as "My Dear Inconsistent Friend", Presler recounts a time when Kitchen tried to convince him to vote for Lloyd C. Stark. Stark then turned on Kitchen and the Kansas City organization. As for Truman, Presler says, "I know you will not experience anything in the future, with him, that you did in the past. He's 100% and of course, you can "sell" me on him.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then candidly comments on his nepotism, saying that, "If I made everybody I've gotten jobs for since 1927 pay me by the month as Bulger used to, we'd have a nice tidy sum to the leeward every month, but I'm just a d.f. I guess I can't take it that way."

Genre: 
Narratives

A longhand note written by Harry S. Truman while he was a judge for Jackson County, Missouri. In this note, Truman provides a character sketch of fellow Jackson County judges Howard J. Vrooman and Robert W. Barr. Truman comments that "I got a lot of good legislation for Jackson Co. over while they [Vrooman and Barr] shot craps... By having a good host [Vrooman] and a man with an inferiority complex [Barr] I was able to expend $7,000,000.00 for the taxpayers benefit. At the same time I gave away about a million in general revenue to satisfy the politicians."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his travel and speaks about Kansas City Bar Association President Henry Depping: "Depping is a Republican and one of the inner circle in K.C. He told me he'd try to get enough Republican candidates into the Senatorial race so they wouldn't vote in my primary."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his speech he gave the previous day and on some of the people he interacted with: "Reverend Foster is the most influential preacher in southeast Missouri and he spent the whole time getting all the facts on Pendergast and Stark. I made lots of hay I'll tell you. But it was hard work. They nearly pulled me to pieces."

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