United States Board of Parole

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Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Ready Mixed Parole Employment Agreement

Agreement between R. P. Lyons, vice president of Ready Mixed Concrete Company, and the United States Board of Parole, stating that Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, will be employed "steadily in the occupation of President" of Ready Mixed Concrete upon his parole, and agreeing to report to U.S. Probation Officer Lewis Grout should Pendergast's work become unsatisfactory. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Parole Officer Assembly Sheet

Parole Officer Assembly Sheet for Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, listing the reports required in each case, including history of correspondence, admission summary, disciplinary actions, and other information. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Parole Hearing Transcript

Transcript of minutes from Tom Pendergast's parole hearing before Arthur D. Wood, chairman of the United States Board of Parole. Pendergast notes his health problems, including a bad heart and colostomy, and lack of prior convictions, as reasons he should be released from the penitentiary. He also discusses his family, his role at Ready Mixed Concrete Company, and a pending indictment in state court.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Notice of Release

Notice of release for Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, registering the details of his release from the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth on May 30, 1940. The report writes that Pendergast was taken into custody by Lewis J. Grout, United States Probation Officer, and asks that attention be given to Pendergast's medical report. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Letter from Floy Smith to Parole Board

Letter from Floy Smith to the United States Parole Board regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Smith writes to protest the parole of Pendergast, saying that Pendergast surely "considered himself getting off very easy with only a 15-months' sentence," and that it would be just for him to serve the full sentence. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Certificate of Conditional Release

Certificate of Conditional Release for Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, stating that Pendergast is receiving a reduction of 90 days from his original sentence on the condition that a fine of $10,000 and past due income taxes are paid. The document also lists Lewis J. Grout as Pendergast's probation officer, and includes a receipt noting the $10,000 fine was paid on April 29, 1940. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S.

Otto P. Higgins Inmate File: Zigmond Parole Recommendation

Letter from Jerry Zigmond regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Zigmond writes that the subject is "basically sound" and that his return "will be of value to the community as a whole." Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Otto P. Higgins Inmate File: Young Parole Recommendation

Letter from Nathan Young, president of the Star Boat and Motor Company, regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Young writes that he and Higgins have been neighbors and served together on boards, and believes that if paroled, the subject "would become a good citizen in every respect." Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Otto P. Higgins Inmate File: Watson Parole Recommendation

Letter from G. R. Watson regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Watson, a neighbor of the Higgins family, writes with compliments for the whole family, and saying that good and moral children could only come from "parents [who] are good citizens and good people." Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Otto P. Higgins Inmate File: Urban Parole Recommendation

Letter from Louis F. and Mr. H. Urban regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. The Urban brothers write that they have done business with and been neighbors to the Higginses for 20 years and "have never heard a word of wrong doing concerning Mr. Higgins until he got mixed up in politics," and believe he deserves leniency. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Otto P. Higgins Inmate File: Trefz Parole Recommendation

Letter from Eugene C. Trefz regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Trefz writes that he believes Higgins to be "a good industrious citizen" who "should be allowed to again support his family." Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Otto P. Higgins Inmate File: Tierney Parole Recommendation

Letter from Monsignor M. D. Tierney of Annunciation Parish regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Monisgnor Tierney believes Higgins resolves to lead a better life, and writes that as his pastor, "it is natural that I should plead for one of my flock and most especially for one who has strayed from the fold." Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.