Harry S. Truman Library and Museum

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A letter from Ready Mixed Concrete Company Vice President R. P. Lyons to Senator Harry S. Truman. Lyons informs Truman that Independence Republican Lyle Weeks was awarded a contracting job by Kansas City and requests that Truman suggest to Weeks to use Ready Mixed Concrete Company concrete for the job.

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman expresses his distaste for social functions, commenting that "I don't do things for people for a reward, if I did I ought to be rich.

Harry S. Truman's final draft of his statement on the reappointment of Maurice Milligan as U.S. Attorney. Truman strongly opposes Milligan's reappointment because he finds him to be morally and professionally unqualified.

Jackson County Judges Harry S. Truman, William O. Beeman, and Eugene I. "Buck" Purcell took the oath of office on January 6, 1931. L-R: Jackson County Clerk Eddie Becker, Eastern district Judge Eugene Purcell, Presiding Judge Harry S. Truman, Western district Judge William O. Beeman, and Jackson County Deputy Sherriff Tiny Johnson.

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Robidoux in Saint Joseph, Missouri to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman requests that Bess send him several items he forgot to pack on his trip to Camp Ripley. He then provides some candid information on Tom Pendergast, Fred Boxley, Frederick Gunn, Edward F.

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and on his endeavor to select the new Kansas City W.P.A. Director: "It looks as if I'm going to get the W.P.A. Director I want. They are inclined to take Harry Easley.

A letter from J. C. Nichols to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Nichols attaches a letter he wrote the same day to Senator Arthur Capper. In Nichols's letter to Capper, Nichols asserts that the federal government should not be wasting building materials on the construction of new federal offices in Washington D.C.

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman informs Kitchen he is sending Kitchen the requested autographed portrait of himself for Kitchen to hang in his office.

Letter from Harry S. Truman to fellow WWI veteran James A. Burkhardt of Springfield, Missouri. Truman writes that he feared his primary election opponent might file a contest to the vote. He then informs Burkhardt that Truman is gifting him his "trusty 45 that I carried all through the late unpleasantness with Kaiser Bill."

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess that he declined an offer from Lucky. He says, "Wouldn't my friends, who know my love for cigarettes, have a grand time wondering how much it takes to buy me[?]"

Letter from Harry S. Truman to J. W. Corn of Oak Grove, Missouri in which Truman proclaims his sincere gratitude for Corn supporting Truman as Democratic nominee for Jackson County Judge. Corn was previously supporting Thomas W. Parrent as nominee until Truman's win at the local primary election.

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman addresses the WPA controversy previously mentioned by Kitchen. He defends his decision in interest of cutting federal expenses where need is no longer as critical.

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