Harry S. Truman Library and Museum

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Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman informs Kitchen that he recommended Mrs. Gene Warner for a position with the Commodity Credit Corporation.

Letter from 10th Ward Precinct Captains Ralph Hickman and Edward Lamasney to their constituents before the 1940 primary election.

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Independence, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on personal matters and then comments that, "This has been a dizzy week. Every day I've been listening to the woes of the taxpayers and getting no where.

Jackson County, Missouri courthouse building as it looked in Kansas City about 1936. Harry S. Truman, as Presiding Judge of Jackson County, was instrumental in the building of the courthouse.

Labor, Vol. XXI, No. 50, July 30, 1940. This special Missouri Edition of Labor: A National Weekly Newspaper was created ahead of the 1940 Primary Election, August 6, in order to inform subscribes to the national labor unions' endorsements of Missouri candidates.

Senator Harry S. Truman, Thomas J. Pendergast, James P. Aylward, James Farley, N. G. Robertson, and David Fitzgerald at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Letter from P. C. Carlock to William A. Kitchen in which Carlock informs Kitchen of his desire to be the sub-carrier in Greenfield, Missouri. Carlock asks him if he may be able to help him procure the position.

Letter from Joseph F. Keirnan, Director of the Department of Liquor Control of Kansas City to attorney Jerome K. Walsh. Keirnan talks of his meeting with former North Side [Columbus Park] precinct captain Johnnie Cozzi.

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman states that he does not believe that a Missouri judge will be appointed for the new position on the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. However, Truman welcomes Kitchen's help to appoint Missourian Charlie Carr.

World War I soldiers, returning from Europe, march down Grand Avenue, Kansas City, Missouri, in a victory parade. Union Station can be seen faintly in the background to the southwest. From: Mrs. D. S. Catechis.

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Independence, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this letter, Truman provides a short update on politics in Kansas City and says, "The Star seems to be softening up somewhat but they have planted a lot of poison."

Letter from Harry S. Truman to his fiancée Bess Wallace while Truman was at Camp La Baholle, near Verdun, France. Truman describes his life's dreams and expectations following the war, including his desire to be a farmer.

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