Kansas City Museum / Union Station, Kansas City, Missouri

Displaying 157 - 168 of 172

Aerial View of Downtown Kansas City Before the 1928 Republican National Convention

Downtown Kansas City as shown from an aerial view before the 1928 Republican National Convention begins on June 12 at Convention Hall. This elevated vantage point faces northeast and shows the Convention Hall in the right-center foreground. The Missouri River is pictured in the far right background.

Advertisement for Coon-Sanders Original Nighthawks Orchestra

An advertisement by Music Corporation of America (MCA) for Coon-Sanders Original Nighthawks Orchestra showing the ensemble seated and playing. Source: John Coon.

A Faded Summer Love

Sheet music cover for A Faded Summer Love, a fox trot ballad, with words and music by Phil Baxter and featuring Ziegfeld star, Ruth Etting. Autographed by Phil Baxter. Source: Cliff Haliburton.

1928 Reunion of Central High School Graduating Class of 1878

Reunion of Central High School graduating class of 1878 with their teacher, Mary Harmon Weeks, held at Newbern Hotel in 1928. Pictured from left to right: Sam Daniels, Kattie Proctor, Robert Shoan, Mary Harmon [Weeks], Lindley Coates, William Dewey, Lulu Butterfield, and John Gilday. Weeks was a leader in the public kindergarten movement and started the first Parent Teacher Association in Missouri. She was also the first president of the Anthenaeum, the oldest active Kansas City women's club, founded in 1894.

1928 Republican National Convention at Convention Hall

Exterior of the Convention Hall that housed the 1928 National Republican Convention in downtown Kansas City, Missouri. This hall was once located on the north side of 13th Street between Wyandotte Street and Central Street. It was razed after the completion of the Municipal Auditorium in 1935. This vantage point faces northeast on Central Street, just south of 13th Street. The caption reads, "Scene of the Republican national convention at Kansas City. A huge spread eagle design on a sunburst jewel was suspended before Convention hall just before the opening of the convention.

1928 Republican National Convention at Convention Hall

Exterior of the Convention Hall that housed the 1928 National Republican Convention in downtown Kansas City, Missouri. This hall was once located on the north side of 13th Street between Wyandotte Street and Central Street. It was razed after the completion of the Municipal Auditorium in 1935. This elevated vantage point faces northeast on Central Street, just south of 13th Street.

"This Modern Age"

Editorial cartoon by S. J. Ray entitled "This Modern Age" (18th Amendment resubmission), no date. The drawing depicts the Missouri Republican Party casting off their shroud of 18th Amendment endorsement jumping into a pool of "resubmission". Source: Vivian Fredericks.

"That McShann Rhythm Section!"

Down Beat photo with caption, "That McShann Rhythm Section!", ca. 1941. The caption reads, "New York - Here they are, beating it out at the Savoy in Harlem. Jay McShann (at the piano) and his rhythm section include Leonard Enois, guitar; Eugene (Pops) Ramey, bass, and Gus Johnson, drums. Playing the Savoy last month, McShann and his barrelhouse Kansas City crew reportedly "carved" Lucky Millinder's band right off the bandstand. The McShann's Confessin' the Blues is the biggest-selling Decca sepia series discing in history.

"Somehow I Don't Feel Too Hopeful"

Editorial cartoon by S. J. Ray entitled "Somehow I Don't Feel Too Hopeful", no date. The drawing shows depictions of "ghost votes" and "protected crime" looking at a depiction of "election and police board appointments". Source: Vivian Fredericks.

"Out of the Frying Pan Into the Fire"

Editorial cartoon by S. J. Ray entitled "Out of the Frying Pan Into the Fire", no date. The drawing shows a depiction of "little business" falling out of the frying pan of New Deal economics and into the fire of "priorities and allocations". Source: Vivian Fredericks.

"It Sometimes Looks Like We Hadn't Come Very Far"

Editorial cartoon by S. J. Ray entitled "It Sometimes Looks Like We Hadn't Come Very Far", no date. The drawing shows depictions of gangsters, "disregard for law", kidnappers, crime, murder, and racketeers abuse civilization as prehistoric life watches. Source: Vivian Fredericks.

"Happy Days" Dance and Floor Show Program

Program cover, "Roosevelt Progressive Democrats present 'Happy Days' Dance and Floor Show," Pla Mor Ballroom, Wednesday Evening, March 14, 1934. The program continues, stating, "The Roosevelt Progressive Democrats cordially welcome you to its "Happy Days" Dance, which is one of a series of Rallies, the Purpose of which is to solidify Democracy, locally, in the State and Nationally, behind the aggressive leadership of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt." Source: Kansas City Museum.