The State Historical Society of Missouri-Kansas City

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The Wornall Homestead Homes Association Annual Dinner on March 15, 1938.

Six men who patrolled certain sections of the Country Club District, a service arranged by the Country Club District Protective Association.

Publicity photograph and signature of J. C. Nichols in 1935.

Carter home on the south side of 54th Street, between Belinder Road (now Belinder Avenue) and Porter Road (now Mission Road). 54th Street in Kansas once ran directly east from the present intersection of Shawnee Mission Parkway and State Park Road. Although once part of Mission, Kansas, this area was developed by J. C.

This picture was taken looking southwest at the future site of the Plaza Time Building.

This picture of the Country Club Plaza Theater Building was taken from atop the Wolferman Building looking southwest, diagonal to the theater at 47th Street and Wyandotte Street.

Home of Arthur T. Bailey at 205 E. 65th Street in Armour Hills. This vantage point faces south-southwest on 65th Street just east of Morningside Drive.

The rock quarry at 55th and Locust Street during the construction of Crestwood Drive.

Younger boys and girls participating in maypole dance at the 1923 Field Day on the grounds of the Pembroke-Country Day School. This vantage point faces east-northeast towards houses on Sunset Hill in the far right background.

The Indian Lane ford over Brush Creek in Mission Hills, Nichols children in the center, Harriet Smith on the left. This vantage point faces southwest towards the intersection of Indian Lane and 63rd Street, pictured left.

An aerial view of the Country Club Plaza in 1930, looking north from the top of the Wornall Road hill. The Walnut Apartments complex is in the foreground.

Antique well-head originally from Barcelona, standing in the lounge. It concealed a drinking fountain. The theater is bounded by 47th Street and the Alameda Road (now Nichols Road), Wyandotte Street, and Central Street.

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