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Letter from R. F. Baynes to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, discussing the state of the Missouri Supreme Court race in New Madrid County. He writes that Prosecuting Attorney J. V. Conran supports Billings and that the Pendergast machine is providing support for Billings in the county. He also writes about state election law and what actions are permissible in campaigning.

Date: 
July 25th 1938

Letter from W. H. Waggoner to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, describing suspicious activity from the courts regarding eligible voter records, and his prediction that Judge James M. Douglas will perform well in elections outside of the Kansas City area.

Date: 
July 29th 1938

Letter from F. H. Norris to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, describing his experience with WPA employement being tied to Pendergast support, as is election board membership. He reports "a man from K.C. who has been hiding out down here in the 'sticks' and boasting that he voted fourteen times in the last election" was hired for a supervisor job.

Date: 
July 28th 1938

Letter from J. B. Crow to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, stating his initial suspicion of Stark as a Pendergast candidate, but upon discovering his middle name was Crow, "said if you had the same blood in you that all the Crows that I knew that you was your own man." He also describes the influence of the Pendergast machine in Plattsburg.

Date: 
July 27th 1938

Letter from William E. Fessant to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, discussing the obstacles he has encountered in obtaining work through the WPA due to his opposition for Pendergast and support for James Douglas. He believes his work, six hours a day at Wallace State Park, "is because the Pendergast gang wanted me where I could do the least amount of electioneering for Judge Douglas."

Date: 
July 28th 1938

Postcard from E. E. West to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, stating his support for James M. Douglas in the upcoming Supreme Court primary and accusing corruption in city concrete business. He reports that the city won't pass inspections for builders who mix their own concrete, "but if Ready Mix furnishes it they pass it without seeing it."

Date: 
July 28th 1938

Letter from R. H. Hoover to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, advocating for a truly secret ballot in Kansas City elections, and suggesting results would be different if that were the practice.

Date: 
July 21st 1938

Letter from Mrs. Anice McKinley, secretary of the Hickory County Democratic Committee, to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, describing local support in Hickory County for James Billings in the Missouri Supreme Court primary, and noting that all WPA jobs and nearly all political appointees were filled with Pendergast men.

Date: 
July 23rd 1938

Letter from C. M. Kackley to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, writing that it has only been a few years since "many poor devil and women have been consigned to the cold gray walls of prison for doing ...

Date: 
July 26th 1938

Letter from F. A. Frock to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, describing election fraud and interference by the Pendergast machine in Norborne, Missouri. Frock describes himself as "a Democrat but not a new dealer as I do not believe in a master and if you dont like it you can go to some foreign country."

Date: 
July 28th 1938

Letter from Edna Wilhoit to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, complaining about corrupt elections, and connections between election judges, WPA workers, and the Pendergast machine.

Date: 
July 29th 1938

Letter from W. B. Massey to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, describing local support for the James Douglas campaign for Missouri Supreme Court, and he believes Douglas will win the county. His only concern is "the ability of the Pendergast machine to vote the WPA workers practically solid."

Date: 
July 26th 1938

Letter from Frank A. Brannock to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, describing Tom Pendergast as the Democratic party's "worst enemy" and describes increased support for James Douglas in Stoddard County for the Missouri Supreme Court primary. Brannock reports that they "are" carrying the fight on Bossism clear down the line, even to the little local Pendergast would be bosses in [Stoddard] County."

Date: 
July 28th 1938

Letter from J. R. Smith to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, describing advertisements distributed around Kansas City to discredit James M. Douglas and promote Pendergast machine positions, and that "cards are being circulated by persons drawing big salaries from the State Liquor Dep."

Date: 
July 26th 1938

Letter from Chas. P. Johnson to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, discussing voter registration, Stark's proposed investigation into the Public Works Administration, clean elections, and the support he is organizing for Judge James Douglas. He is particularly concerned about the lack of rigor in cleaning up voter registrations in St. Louis, and the lack of public confidence that their votes will be secret.

Date: 
July 23rd 1938

Letter from Mrs. N. L. Dwinnett to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, describing a threat she received suggesting she would lose her pension unless she voted for James Billings for Missouri Supreme Court. She pledges her support to Stark and James Douglas.

Date: 
July 27th 1938

Letter from M. Ohern to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, writing that the election for Missouri Supreme Court in Scott County will not be an honest vote as the election judges are Pendergast-allied. He notes that the man who controls the WPA jobs in the county will withhold work unless voters "play ball," and also elections in which "votes have been miscounted or thrown out."

Date: 
July 30th 1938

Letter from Carl Burgoyne Smith to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, reporting that Pendergast influenced many voters from the Missouri School for the Deaf to support Truman in 1934, and wonders if the same is happening in support of James Billings for Missouri Supreme Court.

Date: 
July 30th 1938

Letter from John T. Harding to L. H. Forman, discussing anti-Clark/Douglas circulars being "thrown into the river" in St. Louis.

Date: 
August 2nd 1938

Letter from T. S. Clayton to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, reporting that the "local machine" in Licking are supporting Billings, as are the local WPA heads. Despite this, Clayon feels "sure Douglas will carry this county by a good majority" and "is doing all possible here to put Douglas over."

Date: 
August 1st 1938

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