Houses

Displaying 193 - 204 of 272

An autochrome photograph of R. E. Parsons's residence, taken from the northeast with roses next the garage entrance. Parsons was head of the R.E. Parsons Electric Co.

An autochrome photograph of N. W. Dible's residence, taken looking south-southeast on 56th Street between Ward Parkway and Grassmere Lane. Napoleon Dible built and sold thousands of homes south of the Plaza.

An autochrome photograph of Albert R. Jones's residence, taken from the southeast. Jones was a Kansas City lawyer.

An autochrome photograph of Edward O. Faeth's residence, taken from the east. Faeth was president of the Stowe Hardware & Supply Company.

An autochrome photograph of an unidentified womean standing next to a passion flower vine on the property of Gilbert W. Davis, a public school teacher. This vantage point faces east towards the Davis house in the backyard of the property.

An autochrome photograph of H. H. Beels standing next to a large polygonum vine. Beels was treasurer of Gallup Map & Supply Company.

An autochrome photograph of Helen H. McDermand's house, taken from the southwest. The picture shows urns placed by the house entrance. Her deceased husband, Frank R. McDermand, Jr., was president of the Columbian Hog and Cattle Powder Company.

An autochrome photograph of Annie Ridenbaugh Bird's residence called "Elmhurst", taken from the southeast in the summer of 1933. Once Annie's husband, Joseph T. Bird, passed away in 1918, she took over as president of Emery, Bird, Thayer Company in 1920.

An autochrome photograph of the motor entrance and blooming spireas of "Elmhurst", the residence of Annie Ridenbaugh Bird. Once Annie's husband, Joseph T. Bird, passed away in 1918, she took over as president of Emery, Bird, Thayer Company in 1920.

An autochrome photograph of W. Malcom Lowry's residence, taken from the north. Lowry was a Kansas City engineer at Henrici-Lowry Engineering Company.

An autochrome photograph of Mack B. Nelson's house, taken from the northeast. Nelson was president of the Long-Bell Lumber Company.

An autochrome photograph of Helen H. McDermand's house, taken from the east. Her deceased husband, Frank R. McDermand, Jr., was president of the Columbian Hog and Cattle Powder Company.

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