U.S. Penitentiary, Leavenworth

Displaying 13 - 24 of 245
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from U.S. Marshal A. D. Fairbanks to James V. Bennett, Director of the Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Fairbanks writes that "our friend, Frank Smith, is very anxious to visit" Pendergast before his release from prison, just one month in the future, and inquiring as to whether this would be possible. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Genre: 
Correspondence
Miscellaneous Documents

Letter from N. R. Timmons, Chief Parole Officer at the Leavenworth Penitentiary, to the Jackson County Recorder of Deeds, requesting confirmation of the marital status of Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Recorder John P. Sherrod replies with confirmation that Pendergast married Carolyn "Carrie" E. Snider on February 3, 1911. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Record of interviews and visits for Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, including dates of visits by his family members and attorneys between November 7, 1939, and June 2, 1941. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Memorandum from Robert H. Hudspeth, warden of the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, to James V. Bennett, director of the Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The memo discusses Pendergast assigning his lawyers power of attorney to deal with his income tax liability with the Treasury Department, and lists Pendergast's visitor log, including attorneys and Treasury Department agents. The memo also notes that Pendergast has paid "a substantial portion" of his back taxes owed. Also included is a letter of introduction from Charles O'B.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Dr. A. Sophian to James V. Bennett, director of the U.S. Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Sophian writes that he has been Pendergast's doctor, and writes that he has advised Pendergast to smoke "denicotinized cigarettes in moderation" to avoid aggravating his heart disease, and asks that he be permitted these special cigarettes in the penitentiary where otherwise only ordinary cigarettes are available.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

U.S. Attorney's report on Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, recording Higgins' defense attorney, summarizing the charges, and noting that "the aggravating circumstances are that the income unreported by this prisoner was derived form the lowest and worst elements of the organized underworld of Kansas City." U.S. Attorney Richard K. Phelps reports that local mobster Charles Carollo is a suspected associate, and recommends against parole. Judge J. C. Collet does not concur, noting that this conviction is Higgins' first offense.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Application for parole made by Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, for which he became eligible on October 28, 1939. He states that his plans upon release will be to return to his home to reside with his wife and family, and to return to work as president of Ready Mixed Concrete Company. In support of his application, he notes that this conviction was his first offense, and also notes that he is "constantly in need of Medical Attention." He lists James Kemper and R. P. Lyons as his parole advisor and employer, respectively.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Document assessing information about Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, as relates to his potential parole. The document includes statements that the Pendergast family "has lived in luxury," that Pendergast has no financially dependent family members, and notes that his reputation is divided - friends are "fanatical in their devotion and enemies are equally fanatical in their prejudices." Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from James E. Jones, Acting Prohibition Commisser, regarding the parole of Anthony R. Gizzo, Inmate #20547. Jones reiterates the facts of Gizzo's case and recommends he be denied parole as a "flagrant violator of the Harrison Narcotic Law." Gizzo was sentenced to one year and one day in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth on drug charges.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Conditional release statement for Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, detailing his plans to live with his wife and return to work at his printing plant upon his release. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Special Agent in Charge Charles O'B. Berry to W. H. Woolf, acting chief of the Intelligence Unit of the Bureau of Internal Revenue, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Berry addresses the concerns of Governor Lloyd C. Stark that Pendergast was engaged in his political machine while serving his sentence in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, in violation of the terms of his conviction.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from C. H. Waring, Chief Medical Officer of the U.S. Public Health Service, to N. R. Timmons, parole officer, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Waring recommends that, due to Pendergast's poor health, the Board of Parole interview him in his hospital ward at Leavenworth Penitentiary, and specifically notes his numerous recent heart attacks, including one just a few weeks prior. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S.

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