Aylward, James P.

Displaying 85 - 96 of 106
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to Katherine W. Halterman. Lozier informs Katherine that his nomination for U.S. Senate is unlikely now that T. J. Pendergast supports James P. Aylward's campaign. He then provides an analysis of the Missouri campaign for U.S. Senate.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Office memo from Margaret Carr to Mr. Forman, with the subject line indicating the content is "confidential information from Mr. Harnsbarger." The memo reports that Dick Nacy intends to run for state chairman, and that he will likely receive the support of the Pendergast machine if Jim Aylward opts out.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter updating gubernatorial candidate Lloyd Stark on fundraising activites and expenditures for the campaign.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from A. Reed Wilson to Lloyd C. Stark listing politicians throughout the state with whom he recommends Stark meet, and offering to introduce him to members of the Kemper family.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman to Lloyd C. Stark indicating that he supports Stark's campaign for governor and making suggestions for campaign staff and equipment. He suggests "it would be a good plan to discuss the whole situation iwth Jim Aylward and Jim Pendergast, and abide by the conclusion that the three of you come to."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to William Hirth in which he agrees with Hirth that James P. Aylward will likely enter the Sentorial race with the support of the Kansas City and St. Louis Democratic Organizations.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing C. Bland to his uncle, Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on January 20, 1936. In Bland's lengthy response, he explains how the public views Bland and Mitchell to be connected politically, and how Mitchell consistently jeopardizes Bland by attacking the Kansas City organization for Mitchell's own political gain. Because of Bland's diminished political standing and Mitchell's public connection with Marie Plummer, it would be impossible to leverage for her reinstatement without being charged with nepotism.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Katherine Halterman to Ralph Lozier regarding potential senate candidates.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William P. Harvey to Missouri gubernatorial candidate Lloyd Stark, asking that, along with James Aylward, Jim Pendergast also be invited to his "Corn Husking Bee" to avoid misinterpretation about his appearance alone.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to his nephew, Kansas City Court of Appeals Judge Ewing C. Bland, on January 25, 1937. Mitchell asserts that Bland should resign as judge if Pendergast continues to influence the court. He then substantiates his claim by providing quotes from Bland and Marie Plummer. Mitchell also provides a case as to why Plummer should be retained in her clerical position at the Kansas City Court of Appeals.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to J. W. McCammon on June 29, 1933. Mitchell suggests that McCammon travel to Kansas City to convince James P. Aylward, William T. Kemper, Sr., Thomas J. Pendergast, and Henry F. McElroy to write letter of support for McCammon for appointment to Assistant Director of the Federal Home Loan Bank in Springfield, Missouri.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to William Hirth, publisher and managing editor of The Missouri Farmer, on April 20, 1940. Mitchell supports Lloyd C. Stark's efforts to dismantle the Pendergast Machine, but says that he cannot endorse Stark or anyone else that supports the New Deal. Mitchell also states that "The machine is by no means dead," and that it "is very much alive, not only in Kansas City, but throughout the state." He then provides his opinion on the outlook of the upcoming election for U.S. Senator from Missouri.

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