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Document with figures for the enrollment and budget of Western University, Kansas City, Kansas for the fiscal year 1930. The document states that Western University has 32 faculty and an average of 115 students.

Date: 
1930
During a bright autumn day on October 1, 1933, nearly 2,000 people gathered in the shade of trees along the south side of Brush Creek to officially celebrate the opening of the University of Kansas City. Inspired speeches by Chairman of the Board Ernest E. Howard and Dr. Burris Jenkins, a prominent local minister, declared the founders' intention that the university should serve as an institution of opportunity for Kansas Citians who could not travel far away to attend college.
Author: 
Jason Roe

Panoramic view of Western University Band at Muehlebach Field in 1925, G. H. Taylor, director. Source: Booker T. Washington.

Date: 
1925

Catalog for the State Industrial Department at Western University showing the courses offered for the academic year 1934-1935. Also included are a list of faculty, an academic calendar, reasons for adult education, and a promotion for night school.

Date: 
1934

Invitation to the 35th Annual Commencement Exercises for the Western University and State Industrial Department on June 4, 1931 at Western University.

Date: 
1931

In the second decade of the 20th century, Kansas City was emerging as a key center of economic power west of the Mississippi. Agriculture constituted a central pillar of Kansas City’s success: dozens of railroads shipped grains and livestock through the city’s new hub at Union Station, and its manufacturing district developed large meatpacking, flour, and other food processing industries. Wholesale and retail commerce joined agriculture and industry as the foundations of Kansas City’s economic power.

Author: 
Jaclyn Miller

Truman’s tenure in Jackson County government had a profound impact on Kansas City and Jackson County. He encouraged Jackson Countians to support bond issues during the Great Depression, which left a lasting legacy on the built environment of Kansas City and Jackson County. Even though he was a member of the machine, he developed a bipartisan strategy that ensured Kansas Citians and Jackson Countians would embrace these bond issues, because he wanted to demonstrate to voters that these projects would not just benefit the machine, but everyone.

Author: 
Jon Taylor

From 1918, John B. Bisceglia was a pastor, social worker, teacher, scholar, and civic leader in charge of the Italian Mission of the Central Presbyterian Church. The energetic, young pastor immediately swung into action, starting programs and ministering to his flock. A kindergarten came first, then a free nursery school for working mothers. Sports teams and organizations like Boy Scouts and Campfire Girls followed. A free clinic was established, as well as adult education programs and mothers clubs. He instituted a Sunday evening service in Italian.

Author: 
Mary I. Beveridge

Vocal in print and at the podium, publisher Nelson Crews purchased the Kansas City Sun newspaper and trumpeted a message of advancement. Its reporters covered every aspect of the Kansas City African American community and integrated an organization previously closed to African American workers. Meanwhile his brother James established one of Kansas City’s most important African American institutions, the YMCA at 1824 Paseo .

Author: 
Daniel Coleman

Daniel Arthur Holmes was born the son of slaves in Randolph County, Missouri, in 1876. His family moved to Macon, Missouri, after being freed at the end of the Civil War. Holmes, a third generation preacher, answered the call to preach at age 17 and was ordained in 1901. Holmes began his career in the greater Kansas City area in 1914 as pastor of Metropolitan Baptist Church in Kansas City, Kansas. He later took over leadership at Vine Street Baptist Church at 1835 Vine and soon led the church in an expansion program. By 1927 the church was built at its current location at 25th Street and the Paseo and renamed Paseo Baptist Church. Holmes served as pastor for 46 years—from 1921 to 1967.

Author: 
Kimberly R. Riley

Invitation from the Music Department at Western University presenting a recital with Bobbie Boggess, lyric soprano and Laveeda Boggess, pianist. The event was held at the University Auditorium on Friday, May 30, 1941.

Date: 
May 30th 1941

Program by the Music Department at Western University presenting a recital with Bobbie Boggess, lyric soprano and Laveeda Boggess, pianist. The event was held at the University Auditorium on Friday, May 30, 1941 and included works by Bach, Puccini, Hayden, et al..

Date: 
May 30th 1941

As the brainchild of Kansas City philanthropist William Volker, the Board of Public Welfare was the first modern welfare department in the United States, a groundbreaking forerunner to modern welfare programs, and intended as a counterbalance to the charitable activities of the city's political machines led by Tom Pendergast and Joe Shannon. The board was just one of Volker’s many memorable contributions that included the creation of Research Hospital , the establishment of the University of Kansas City (now UMKC), the Civic Research Institute, the purchase of the land for Liberty Memorial , and reportedly thousands of individuals who received his gifts when down on their luck.

Author: 
Jason Roe

Letter from Kansas State College President W. A. Lewis to Kansas Governor Harry H. Woodring. Lewis extends his support for the accreditation of Western University as a junior college. Lewis comments, "Personally I would be inclined to be far more linient with the colored people in their deficiencies than I would be if it were an institution for the whites."

Date: 
April 8th 1932

Letter from Reverend S. E. Newell, Pastor of African M. E. Church in Kansas City, Kansas to Kansas Governor Harry H. Woodring. Newell expresses his concern over the political allegiances Professor J. P. King, currently head of Western University. Instead, he suggests Professor G. A. Gregg, to head the university.

Date: 
May 12th 1932

Letter from Kansas City, Kansas Lawyer C. Clyde Myers to Kansas Governor Harry H. Woodring in which Myers provides recommendations for the Committee of Western University. He does so in knowledge of a rift between Methodists and Baptists for influence over the university.

Date: 
February 6th 1932

Girard Bryant was a highly respected teacher and school administrator in Kansas City for 45 years. As a community leader, he took an active part in major social issues of the day, particularly education, race relations, health care and law enforcement. Bryant came to Kansas City in 1926 to teach at Western Baptist Seminary and later at the Kansas Vocational School in Topeka. He became a teacher in the Kansas City School District in 1930 and remained with the district until 1964. During his long tenure he filled many positions, including teacher and vice-principal at Lincoln High School, and dean of Lincoln Junior College.

Author: 
David Conrads

With Kansas City, Missouri, physician, T. C. Unthank, M.D., Dr. Thompson founded Douglass Hospital and Training School for Nurses. Dr. Thompson’s hospital fell under the authority of the African Methodist Episcopal Church in 1905. In 1924 the hospital purchased a new building at 336 Quindaro Boulevard. In 1937 it moved, for the last time, to 3700 North 27th Street, on the campus of Western University.

Author: 
Nancy J. Hulston

Letter from F. J. Peck, president and superintendent of Western University, to Governor Ben Paulen regarding staff turmoil at Western University. He writes that the "little unrest" is caused by individuals who want his job, and that he has issues with male teachers because he objects to teachers dating female students. Peck also notes that the school graduated 89 students and mentions he does not want to replace a current domestic arts teacher.

Date: 
June 15th 1926

Letter from F. J. Peck, president and superintendent of Western University, to Governor Ben Paulen, thanking Paulen for and discussing his recent visit to the university, and further describing financial shortfalls facing the school and asking for Paulen's help in gaining additional funding from the Board of Administration, who have been resistent to doing so.

Date: 
March 27th 1926

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