Correspondence

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Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri.

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then recounts one man's opinion of the Missouri political climate: "Had a letter from J.

Letter from Joseph F. Keirnan, Director of the Department of Liquor Control of Kansas City to attorney Jerome K. Walsh. Keirnan talks of his meeting with former North Side [Columbus Park] precinct captain Johnnie Cozzi.

Letter from Harry S. Truman to Kansas City Department of Civics Secretary Carl B. Jenkins. In this correspondence, Truman clarifies his previous statement of "politics and business will not mix." He states that if elected judge, he would not have time to conduct private business affairs, as his time is paid for by the public.

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess of a growing rift between Truman and Bennett C. Clark: "Bennett, I suppose will be in Kansas City Saturday.

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his morning, including a meeting with Boyle Clark. When inquired about Missouri Governor Lloyd C. Stark, Truman said to Boyle Clark, "... I hadn't and didn't want to hear from the S.O.B.

Letter from Porter T. Hall to Judge Nelson E. Johnson in which Hall states he will no longer be voting for Johnson for Judge of Jackson County. Instead, he writes of his interest in the re-election of Judges Henry F. McElroy and Harry S. Truman.

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen updates Truman on General Joe Keenan's visit to Kansas City on May 14, 1938. As requested by Truman, Kitchen mentioned to Keenan that Fred Canfill would be an excellent pick for U.S. Marshall at Kansas City.

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Great Bend, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman elaborates on the hospitality he is receiving in Great Bend, saying that, "This is almost like campaigning for President except that the people are making promises to me instead of the other way around."

Letter from Frank E. Thompson to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Thompson informs Truman that he had been let go of his job as a machinist without cause. After attempting to contact James M. Pendergast, he asks for Truman to use his influence to prompt his reinstatement as machinist.

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen informs Truman he just saw Truman's good friend P. C. Carlock. Kitchen asks Truman to do what it takes to appoint Carlock to his desired position as sub-carrier at Greenfield, Missouri.

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Robidoux in Saint Joseph, Missouri to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman requests that Bess send him several items he forgot to pack on his trip to Camp Ripley. He then provides some candid information on Tom Pendergast, Fred Boxley, Frederick Gunn, Edward F.

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