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Photograph of graduates of St. James Grade School. Monsignor John W. Keyes, pastor of St. James is pictured along with Rose Muser (5th from right).

Photograph of pallbearers carrying the body of Monsignor James T. Walsh who erected the Our Lady of Good Counsel Church at 3934 Washington Street, Kansas City, Missouri. Walsh died on November 20, 1925 and was buried three days later.

Photograph of Visitation Church (right) and rectory (left) at the southeast corner of Main Street and 51st Terrace.

Photograph of the Annunciation Boys Choir on an Easter Sunday in the early 1940's.

Photograph of the first graduating class of Visitation Church posed with Father Thomas McDonald.

Photograph of the first St. Francis Xavier Church, constructed at the northwest corner of 53rd Street and Forest Avenue in 1910. The building was destroyed by a fire on September 19, 1925.

Photograph of the Friars' choir at Kirkwood Hall at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. The choir is comprised of members of the local diocese and directed by Reverend Albert Q. Senn, O.F.M. Identified are Senn (front center); Vincent J. O'Flaherty of Redemptorist Church (top row, 3rd from left); James A. Comiskey of St.

Photograph of the Annunciation CYC softball team in June, 1941. Annunciation parish was located at 2870 Linwood Boulevard.

Photograph of Redemptorist High School students posed on the front steps of the building facing Linwood Boulevard.

Photograph of Our Lady of Good Counsel Church. This vantage point faces west on Washington Street just south of 39th Terrace.

Photograph of people standing outside the entrance to St. Vincent's Church. This vantage point faces west from the east side of Flora Avenue, just south of 31st Street.

Issac Katz

Isaac "Ike" Katz, who would go on to found the Katz Drug Co. in Kansas City and become a pioneer in the modern pharmacy business, was born in the town of Husiatin in western Ukraine (then a part of Russia) on March 8, 1879. Ike Katz brought customers into his drug stores with a unique business model, where customers could fill prescriptions, shop for groceries, buy appliances, and even purchase exotic pets such as monkeys or baby alligators; all at cut-rate prices. At its peak in the 1950s and 1960s, the company boasted 65 retail locations spread across seven states.

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