Pendergast, Thomas J.

Displaying 889 - 900 of 902

Separate plea in abatement of defendant, T. J. Pendergast for Criminal Case No. 14937: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this document, attorneys for Pendergast ask the court to remove said defendant from the indictment based upon the evidence provided within.

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 14567: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Defendant. In this indictment, the defendant is charged with income tax fraud for the calendar years 1935 and 1936. Pendergast reported $117,378.41 in gross income in 1936 while the true figure was $441,115.33.

Separate plea in abatement of defendant, T. J. Pendergast for Criminal Case No. 14912: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this document, attorneys for Pendergast ask the court to remove said defendant from the indictment based upon the evidence provided within.

Memorandum in plea for abatement of indictment for Criminal Case No. 14937: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this document, attorneys for Pendergast submit a request to void the indictment for the reason outlined within.

Capias for Thomas J. Pendergast in Criminal Case No. 14567: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Defendant. This capias commands H. L. Dillingham, U.S. Marshal, to arrest Thomas J. Pendergast for income tax fraud. His bond for appearance is $10,000.

Separate plea in abatement of defendant, A. L. McCormack for Criminal Case No. 14912: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this document, attorneys for McCormack ask the court to remove said defendant from the indictment based upon the evidence provided within.

Home of Jackson County Democratic Party boss, Thomas J. Pendergast, at 5650 Ward Parkway, built by the J. C. Nichols Company. This vantage point faces west on Ward Parkway, just north of 57th Street.

Union Station

On June 17, 1933, four law enforcement officers and their prisoner, Frank Nash, were fatally wounded in a botched rescue attempt outside Union Station. The story of the Union Station Massacre, as it became known, centered on Frank Nash, who had been convicted of three separate crimes of a serious nature: murder, armed burglary, and then assault.

Mary McElroy

One of Kansas City's most sensational and ultimately tragic crimes began on May 27, 1933 with the kidnapping of Mary McElroy, the daughter of controversial city manager Henry F. McElroy, who had close ties to the political machine operated by “Boss” Tom Pendergast. She was released after 34 hours of captivity, following payment of a $30,000 ransom, but she never recovered from the emotional turmoil that ensued.

Joseph Shannon

Joseph “Joe” Shannon presided over Kansas City’s Northside Democratic Party from the early 20th century to 1930, after which he relocated to Washington, D.C., for a 14-year tenure as a U.S. Congressman. Shannon’s political career was marked by his Jeffersonian Democratic views and his tenuous relationships with brothers James and Tom Pendergast.

Park Central Hotel

Johnny Lazia (born Lazzio) gained prominence in Kansas City’s politics during the 1920s and ‘30s due to his leadership of the North Side Democratic Club, engagement in local organized crime, and involvement with Tom Pendergast’s political machine. Pendergast dominated Kansas City politics not by holding elected offices, but through his machine of alliances and affiliates.

General Hospital No. 2 Exterior

"They did not try to build something ‘good enough for Negroes’ but something as good as money could buy." This is how Chester Arthur Franklin, the Republican founder of The Call newspaper and one of Kansas City’s most prominent black leaders, greeted the newly constructed eight-story building that housed General Hospital No. 2, serving the indigent African American population of Kansas City.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY