Truman, Harry S.

Displaying 397 - 408 of 442

From Gared H. Murray to Harry S. Truman

Telegram from Grandview, Missouri Mayor Gared H. Murray to Senator Harry S. Truman. Murray informs Truman that the price for a proposed airport runway in Grandview, Missouri has been reduced to $175 per acre. Murray provides additional reasons to choose the Grandview site for airport runway construction.

From G. H. Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr.

Letter from G. H. Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 26, 1934. Foree reports on John J. Cochran's political meeting in St. Louis of the previous evening and on Cochran's projected polling in St. Louis. He recounts, "They are claiming 10 to 1 of all the combined votes of [Jacob L.] Milligan and [Harry S.] Truman in the city." Foree also mentions that Cochran recently traveled to Kansas City to meet with Thomas J. Pendergast.

From G. H. Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr.

Letter from G. H. Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 19, 1934. In the U.S. Senate race, Foree notes candidates Jacob L. Milligan and John J. Cochran fighting each other, but notes little press in St. Louis on Harry S. Truman. On this point, Foree comments, "Pendergast never did hunt ducks with a brass band."

From G. H. Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr.

Letter from G. H Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 14, 1934. Foree speculates how the current field of U.S. Senate candidates for Missouri formed and who will win at election. He comments, "This coming primary is not one in which the choice of Democracy will win- it will be Boss manipulated."

From G. H. Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr.

Letter from G. H. Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. in which Foree requests an appointment to the Treasury Alcohol Tax Unit as an Internal Revenue officer, commonly called "Prohibition Agents". Foree also informs Mitchell that John J. Cochran entered the race for U.S. Senate of Missouri.

From G. H. Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr.

Letter from G. H. Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. in which Foree discusses the possible outcome of the U.S. Senate campaign in Missouri. He predicts Bennett C. Clark will be "diplomatic enough and spineless enough in case Thurman [Truman] is nominated and elected... to get in the good graces of 'Boss Tom.'"

From G. G. Starmer to Lloyd C. Stark

Letter from George G. Starmer to Lloyd C. Stark regarding campaign appointments.

From Fred Canfil to Harry S. Truman

Letter from Fred Canfil to Harry S. Truman in which Canfil presents a way to sway the vote of the WPA workers for the upcoming primary election by speaking critically of Lloyd C. Stark.

From Frank E. Thompson to Harry S. Truman

Letter from Frank E. Thompson to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Thompson informs Truman that he had been let go of his job as a machinist without cause. After attempting to contact James M. Pendergast, he asks for Truman to use his influence to prompt his reinstatement as machinist. Thompson mentions he is a committed member of the 12th Ward Pendergast Democratic Club under the direction of Tommy Fitzgerald.

From F. E. Gallup to Harry S. Truman

Letter from Gallup Map & Supply Co. President F. E. Gallup to Harry S. Truman. The letter serves as confirmation of delivery of 15,000 Jackson County maps to be used for Truman's judge campaign. The back of the letter includes a 1916 sample map of Kansas City, Missouri.

From Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to William Hirth

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to William Hirth, publisher and managing editor of The Missouri Farmer, on April 20, 1940. Mitchell supports Lloyd C. Stark's efforts to dismantle the Pendergast Machine, but says that he cannot endorse Stark or anyone else that supports the New Deal. Mitchell also states that "The machine is by no means dead," and that it "is very much alive, not only in Kansas City, but throughout the state." He then provides his opinion on the outlook of the upcoming election for U.S. Senator from Missouri.

From Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Westbrook Pegler

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Westbrook Pegler, newspaper columnist, on September 13, 1940. Mitchell informs Pegler of Senator Carl Hatch's ties to Thomas J. Pendergast and Harry S. Truman.