Election Frauds--1936

Displaying 85 - 96 of 272

A series of letters from Mrs. W. W. Henderson to Lloyd Stark in which she characterizes his base of support across Missouri.

Letter from W. M. Ledbetter, the secretary of the Stark for Governor Organization, updating Lloyd Stark on campaign activities across the state.

Letter from Lloyd Stark to Jack Stapleton, editor of 'The Stanberry Headlight.' He indicates his desire to come to St. Joseph for the Northwest Missouri Press Association meeting but wants Stapleton not to mention the possibility of his being there.

Response letter from Governor Guy Park to Joseph Morton assuring him that the Kansas City Election Board is properly handling voter rolls. He also accuses the Kansas City Star of "political animus."

Letter from Clarence Cannon updating Lloyd Stark on his interactions regarding his candidacy for governor. He reports that Duke Shoop from the Kansas City Star "said that no man from either Kansas City or St. Louis could be elected ... the next Governor would come from the country."

Letter from I. N. Watson to Jesse Barrett, describing his preference for caution in reacting to indictments of persons responsible for voting fraud in Kansas City.

Response letter from Governor Park to Frances E. Hatfield of Kansas City indicating that she should contact the authorities or provide evidence if she has knowledge of election fraud activities.

Letter from Mrs. B. Marts to Guy B. Park reporting on rampant voter fraud in Kansas City.

Letter from Governor Guy Park to H. V. Shirts, downplaying the Kansas City Star's recent allegations of election fraud. He indicates that the paper is biased toward Republicans.

Letter from I. N. Watson to Jesse Barrett, losing Republican candidate for Missouri Governor, describing the prosecution of perpetrators of vote-rigging in Kansas City.

Letter from Jack Stapleton to Lloyd Stark referencing Harry Truman's attitudes toward the Stark gubernatorial candidacy.

Letter to Orrin Shaw indicating candidate Lloyd Stark's intention to hold a labor meeting in Kansas City.

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