Pendergast Machine

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Article from the New York World-Telegram on Tom Pendergast, in which the Kansas City boss offers his opinions on political machines, strong bosses and local politics. He and Mayor Bryce Smith also discuss Pendergast's Ready Mixed Concrete Company.

Letter from Jimmy Hurst to Lloyd C. Stark warning him of a potential situation of concern involving Matthew Murray, director of the state relief fund, and his concern that Murray "might be something sinister in the making."

Letter from Carl Burgoyne Smith to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, reporting that Pendergast influenced many voters from the Missouri School for the Deaf to support Truman in 1934, and wonders if the same is happening in support of James Billings for Missouri Supreme Court.

Letter from Albert K. Mitchell to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on August 27, 1940. Albert acknowledges receipt of information provided by Ewing concerning Pendergast support of Truman's senate reelection campaign. Albert also discusses U.S. Senator of New Mexico Carl Hatch and his support for the Pendergast Machine.

Letter from Elsie Belle McD to Governor Lloyd C. Stark discussing support throughout the state for James Douglas in his campaign for the Missouri State Supreme Court.

Manuscript in which Milton C. Lewis outlines talking points (possibly for a speech) concerning political, social, and economic issues that affect the Kansas City black community. The first talking point mentions the Pendergast Machine and efforts to dismantle it.

Henry McElroy

Henry F. McElroy was hand picked in 1926 by boss Thomas J. Pendergast to be Kansas City’s first city manager. This gave Pendergast complete control over Kansas City.

General Hospital No. 2 Exterior

"They did not try to build something ‘good enough for Negroes’ but something as good as money could buy." This is how Chester Arthur Franklin, the Republican founder of The Call newspaper and one of Kansas City’s most prominent black leaders, greeted the newly constructed eight-story building that housed General Hospital No. 2, serving the indigent African American population of Kansas City.

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