Clark, Bennett C.

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Truman-Stark-Milligan

Southeastern Missouri newspaper clipping reporting on Governor Lloyd C. Stark's campaign announcement for U.S. Senator of Missouri. The author favors Senator Harry S. Truman for reelection as he is believed to have a better chance of beating a Republican nominee over his Democratic rivals Stark and Maurice M. Milligan. The author then paints a favorable portrait of Truman and tells the reader to not fear his association with Pendergast, saying, "Don't be foolish enough to vote against him [Truman] just because Tom Pendergast was for him.

Truman's First Nomination for Senator was Stolen

Pamphlet written by Ewing Young Mitchell, former Assistant Secretary of Commerce in Franklin D. Roosevelt administration's first term. He asserts "[t]he first nomination for United States Senator of Harry S. Truman was stolen," and proceeds to argue that point. The Pendergast machine is described as "the most corrupt, the most brazen, gang of thieves who ever looted an American city," and describes the Pendergasts' businesses' activities and obstructions around the city.

Relationship of Ralph E. Truman and Olive L. Truman with Harry S. Truman: 1940 Senatorial Campaign

Essay documenting the role Ralph E. Truman and Olive L. Truman played in the 1940 U.S. Senatorial campaign in Missouri. Olive describes how Governor Lloyd C. Stark asked for Ralph's support for Stark's senatorial campaign, as Stark had recently appointed Ralph to a General. After Ralph put his support towards the reelection of his cousin Senator Harry S. Truman, Stark attempted to have Ralph's status as General revoked. In response, Ralph, Olive, and Bennett C. Clark resolved to get another Democratic candidate to enter to decrease Stark's chance of nomination.

Relationship of Ralph E. Truman and Olive L. Truman with Harry S. Truman: 1934 Senatorial Campaign

Essay documenting the role Ralph E. Truman and Olive L. Truman played in the 1934 U.S. Senatorial campaign in Missouri. Olive details how her and her husband helped Jacob L. Milligan with his campaign before learning that Ralph's cousin Harry S. Truman would enter as well. The two had committed themselves to the Milligan campaign and could not aid Harry. Olive also details tactics used by the Pendergast Organization during this campaign.

Missouri "Machine Busting"

Clipping from Time (magazine) on February 22, 1937 detailing the election fraud that occured in Kansas City during the 1936 General Election. The article features extended quotes from Judge Albert L. Reeves concerning the election fraud, including the following: "We can't surrender the ballot boxes to thugs, gangsters and plug-uglies who patrol the streets with machine guns. We can't stand for that any longer." The article then provides a history of political corruption in Kansas City through 1936.

Memo for the Press

Memo for the press containing a response from Governor Lloyd C. Stark to a report from the US Senate's Gillette Committee to Investigate Campaign Expenditures. Stark says the report proves that allegations against his camapign were "just another effort of the Pendergast remnants and their allies in the 'smear Stark movement' designed to put the Pendergast crowd back in control of Missouri."

Letter from Lloyd C. Stark to Fred Blair Townsend

Letter from Governor Lloyd C. Stark to Hon. Fred Blair Townsend, regarding Missouri's delegation to the Democratic National Convention. Stark says he believes that "Missouri is safely in line with the Roosevelt forces."

Letter from "Executive Secretary" to Hon. Drew Pearson

Letter signed "Executive Secretary" to Hon. Drew Pearson, regarding the Missouri delegation to the Democratic National Convention in Chicago. The letter says that, despite the efforts of the "anti-Roosevelt forces, headed by Missouri's Senior Senator" Bennett Clark and the Pendergast machine, the Missouri delegation to the convention "will be guided ... by a strongly worded resolution praising President Roosevelt's leadership," favored by Governor Stark.

Jesse Barrett Press Release

Text of a speech given by Jesse Barrett at the Annual Reunion of Montgomery County Old Settlers, 1938

James M. Pendergast, Bennett Champ Clark, and Joe Shannon

Clipping showing James M. Pendergast, Bennett Champ Clark, and Joe Shannon (left to right) conversing to together. The caption implies that these men intend to split the vote into three during the Democratic primary in Missouri so as to insure that their preferred candidate wins.

Future: Vol. II, No. 2

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a notice that Future’s publishers plan to temporarily suspend publication to reorganize the paper, and also note that “youth is interested and youth is organizing,” and “FUTURE is their paper.” Other featured articles include: “Why Charge a Cover?” (p.

Future: Vol. II, No. 1

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the “lug,” “an involuntary or forced contribution to something a luckless employee isn’t nearly as interested in” as his and his family’s own welfare. Other featured articles include “T. J. and W. T.” (page 2), about patching up of differences between William Kemper, Sr. ("Democratic national committeeman for Missouri") and Tom Pendergast (Democratic No.